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University College London (UCL), Law Faculty Events

Britain & Europe Seminar Series: The Single Market and liberalisation, harmonisation and mutual recognition: time to rethink the balance of competences between the EU and the Member States?

UCL Faculty of Laws Events

Wednesday, November 27, 2013 at 6:00 PM (GMT)

London, United Kingdom

Britain & Europe Seminar Series: The Single Market and...

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Britain & Europe
Seminar Series

 

The Single Market and liberalisation, harmonisation and
mutual recognition: Time to rethink the balance of
competences between the EU and the
member states? 


Speakers:
 Professor Kenneth Armstrong, University of Cambridge

Professor Kalypso Nicolaidis, University of Oxford

Professor Stephen Weatherill, University of Oxford

Chaired by Dr Ioannis Lianos,
Reader in Economics and Competition Law, UCL 

 

Wednesday 27th November 2013
from 6 - 7.30pm 

 

 

The establishment of a (single) internal market has been a major ambition and one of the most important achievements of the project of European integration. The interplay of the principles of market liberalisation, harmonization and mutual recognition, has been an essential feature of the European Internal Market law and policy.

The recent financial and economic crisis may have tested some of the achievements of the European integration project although this has not yet led to a resurgence of the protectionist policies of the past. The economic and social crisis that followed raises questions over the costs and benefits for each jurisdiction of the Single Market, in particular because of the important trade imbalances between Member States of the EU, some of which enjoy a significant trade surplus, while others record trade deficits. 

The panel will delve into these governance aspects of the Single Market project and their underlying politics. It will also discuss the findings and proposals of the recent Single Market Report – Review of the Balance of Competences, released in July 2013 by the British Government, which examines the balance of competences between the European Union and the United Kingdom in the area of the Single Market and explores the impact of the Single Market on the UK national interest.

Biographies of the speakers

Kalypso Nicolaïdis is Professor of International Relations and director of the Center for International Studies at the University of Oxford. She was previously associate professor at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. She is chair of Southeastern European Studies at Oxford and Council member of the European Council of Foreign Relations. In 2012-2013, she was Emile Noel-Straus Senior Fellow at NYU Law School (2012-2013). In 2008-2010, she was a member of the Gonzales reflection group on the future of Europe 2030 set up by the European Council. She also served as advisor on European affairs to George Papandreou in the 90s and early 2000s, the Dutch government in 2004, the UK government, the European Parliament, the European Commission, OECD and UNCTAD. She has published widely on international relations in general and international trade in particular, as well as the internal and external aspects of European integration in numerous journals including Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, The Journal of Common Market Studies, Journal of European Public Policy  and International Organization. Her last book is European Stories: Intellectual Debates on Europe in National Context (OUP, 2010).  She received her PhD from Harvard in 1993. 

Kenneth Armstrong was elected to the Professorship of European law, University of Cambridge in 2013. Previously he was Professor of European Union law at Queen Mary, University of London. He researches and writes on issues on EU social and economic governance. His monograph, Governing Social Inclusion: Europeanization through Policy Coordination (Oxford UP, 2010) won the 2011 University Association for Contemporary European Studies book prize. His current research analyses the legal response to the economic crisis in Europe. He has served on the editorial boards of Public Law and the European Law Journal and has held visiting positions at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, the European University Institute and at the Jean Monnet Center, New York School of Law. 

 

Stephen Weatherill is the Jacques Delors Professor of European Law. He also serves as Deputy Director for European Law in the Institute of European and Comparative Law, and is a Fellow of Somerville College. His research interests embrace the field of European Law in its widest sense, although his published work is predominantly concerned with European Union trade law. He is co-author of WEATHERILL AND BEAUMONT's EU LAW Penguin Books, 3rd edition,1999, with Paul Beaumont). He is the author of LAW AND INTEGRATION IN THE EUROPEAN UNION (Oxford University Press, 1995), EU CONSUMER LAW AND POLICY (Edward Elgar, 2nd edition, 2005), CASES AND MATERIALS ON EU LAW (Oxford University Press, 9th edition, 2010) and co-author of CONSUMER PROTECTION LAW (Ashgate Publishing, 2nd edition, 2005, with Geraint Howells and EUROPEAN ECONOMIC LAW (Dartmouth Publishing, 1997, with Hans Micklitz). The areas in which he has published papers in journals and edited collections in recent years include; the impact of subsidiarity in EU law; the involvement of the EU in private law; aspects of "flexible" integration in Europe; the elaboration of strategies for the management of the internal market; sport and the law including the ruling in BOSMAN; and the law and practice of product safety. In Oxford, his teaching interests focus on EU law. He has taught on the European Business Regulation course, Land and Competition Law, offered to BCL and Mjur students and has also taught at undergraduate level.



About this seminar series

 

The relationship between Britain and Europe is a highly contested issue that dominates political and academic debates. The UCL 'Britain and Europe' seminar series examines the relationship between the United Kingdom, and both the European Union and the Council of Europe. The aim of the series is to discuss important policy issues, with a special focus on their legal dimension. Topics to be addressed include the EU referendum, immigration, human rights, competition policy and taxation. This series is in association with the UCL European Institute, UCL Institute for Human Rights and the UCL Centre for Law and Governance in Europe.

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When & Where


UCL Faculty of Laws Moot Court
Bentham House
Endsleigh Gardens<br />
WC1H 0EG London
United Kingdom

Wednesday, November 27, 2013 at 6:00 PM (GMT)


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Organizer

UCL Faculty of Laws Events

For almost 200 years, UCL Laws has been one of the leading centres of legal education in the world. Its established reputation for cutting-edge legal research places it at the heart of policy, practice and impact. 

The Faculty offers an unmatched educational environment, producing high quality graduates able to confidently face the evolving challenges of the global legal landscape. 

The Faculty boasts 63 leading academics engaged in teaching and research at the very highest level - actively contributing to law-making, jurisprudence and legal policy on an international scale. 

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