This event has ended

UCL School of Public Policy & European Institute Seminar: Global Corruption

UCL Department of Political Science

Monday, 13 May 2013 at 17:00 (BST)

London, United Kingdom

UCL School of Public Policy & European Institute Seminar:...

Registration Information

Type End     Quantity
General Admission Ended Free  

Who's Going

Loading your connections...

Share UCL School of Public Policy & European Institute Seminar: Global Corruption

Event Details

UCL European Institute and School of Public Policy Event

Laurence Cockcroft: Corruption is a key issue which relates to economic development, income distribution and the credibility of political institutions. LC will ask the question : why is corruption so prevalent after fifteen years of  international action, much of which has translated into legislation  and regulation at the national level ?  In response he will analyse the main drivers of corruption at the small scale and national level, including particularly the roles of political finance, organised crime and the local and international corporate sector.  He will identify the main roadblocks to making progress (including the roles of the shadow economy, secrecy jurisdictions and geo politics) and suggest that real progress depends on addressing these amongst other issues. He will show how the current agenda of the G8 and G20 covers some key corruption related questions, and will discuss how the far this is likely to translate into  practical action.

Laurence Cockcroft is the author of Global Corruption : Money, Power and Ethics in the Modern World (I. B Tauris  UK and Penn Press US, 2012)

Susan Rose-Ackerman (Yale): International Actors and the Promises and Pitfalls of Anti-Corruption Reform Policies to control corruption will always be controversial and contested, especially when anti-corruption measures are imposed or supported by international actors—most notably aid and lending bodies, global non-profits, or international treaty regimes.  Modern states face fundamental political/economic problems, and corruption can exacerbate these problems.  Reductions in corruption are part of the global focus on improving human well-being and government functioning. The talk will consider feasible options for international bodies operating under severe political and financial constraints.  Under some conditions, neither domestic governments nor donor representatives see benefits from documenting corruption and from taking concrete steps to reduce its impact.  Investors may share this reluctance.  Here is where independent groups and the media need to concentrate attention by prodding donors and governments to take corruption seriously. We also need more research that documents successes and failures of policy efforts.  Corruption is a complex phenomenon that is difficult to measure, but in recent years researchers have developed a number of clever strategies to measure corruption or its impact. Stronger links should be formed between aid projects and information provision so that governments can learn from others’ experiences.  The system of international dispute resolution should consider corruption and self-dealing.  Arbitrators are beginning to acknowledge that their decisions can affect the citizens of host countries—as well as the integrity of the international trade and investment regime.  Criminal prosecutions are likely to remain the province of domestic courts for the foreseeable future, but international bodies can do more to help develop criminal cases and to support reform of criminal justice systems.  Anti-corruption initiatives need to take a more holistic approach.  There appears to be too much specialization of function among international bodies, permitting corruption to flourish in the grey zones where no agency can act, or worse, where no one has an interest in acting. 

Susan Rose-Ackerman is the Henry R. Luce Professor of Jurisprudence (Law and Political Science) with joint appointments between Yale Law School and the Yale Department of Political Science.

 

 

Do you have questions about UCL School of Public Policy & European Institute Seminar: Global Corruption? Contact UCL Department of Political Science

When & Where



Gavin De Beer Lecture Theatre
Medical Sciences and Anatomy Building
Gower Street
London
WC1E 6BT

United Kingdom

Monday, 13 May 2013 at 17:00 (BST)


  Add to my calendar

Organiser

UCL Department of Political Science

The Department of Political Science / School of Public Policy is Britain's only department focused on Graduate teaching and research. It offers a uniquely stimulating environment for the study of all fields of politics, including international relations, political theory, human rights and public policy-making and administration.

Located in the magnificent School of Public Policy in one of London's most beautiful squares, we are entirely geared towards the needs of Masters and Doctoral students. Our eight Masters degrees and doctoral training programme are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council and the Arts and Humanities Research Council. With over 400 students, we offer one of the largest politics graduate programmes in the UK.

The School acts as the bridge between UCL's world-class research and the policy-making community in Britain and internationally.


NOTICE OF FILMING
Some of our events are being used to photograph and record video and film footage in connection with the promotional and 
publicity campaign of the Departmental series.
By your attendance in the events, you acknowledge that you 
have been informed that you may be photographed and 
recorded as part of the release in home video and/or any 
media now known or hereafter devised, in perpetuity 
throughout the universe and the advertising and 
publicity thereof. Further, by your presence, you 
grant your permission for your likeness and voice to be 
included therein without compensation, credit or other 
consideration. If you do not wish to be photographed, 
recorded, or appear under these conditions, you should 
inform the Department in advance. Thank you for your 
cooperation.

  Contact the Organiser

Please log in or sign up

In order to purchase these tickets in installments, you'll need an Eventbrite account. Log in or sign up for a free account to continue.