2016 International strengthening health systems to improve health outcomes
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2016 International strengthening health systems to improve health outcomes

2016 International strengthening health systems to improve health outcomes

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CEME Conference Centre

Marsh Way

Rainham, United Kingdom

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The annual conference on strengthening health systems is an international academic event with plenty of opportunity for networking and debate. In an informal setting, this meeting will bring you up to date with current research and thinking regarding health systems, prevention and treatment of diseases, issues and challenges of health care sectors. Presenting at this event, we will have a variety of clinicians, academics and health care professionals; we encourage presentations from the wide spectrum of scientiUic researchers, development and healthcare professionals. 

This innovative and stimulating event is aimed at those working in health sector, academia, research laboratories, hospitals, clinicians and postgraduate students.

This event has an open abstract session.

Abstracts can be submitted on any subject related to strengthening health care, disease prevention and treatment.

The Deadline for abstract submissions for oral presentation is September 2nd 2016. 

On day 2 of the Conference, delegates have the opportunity to attend a free one day health and social care skills development and compliance training delivered by LPTC professionals and experts. List of free courses include; Infection control, Health and safety, Basic life support, Food safety, COSHH, First Aid at work, GLP (Good Laboratory Practice) and GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice). 

Attendees will receive a UK certificate globally recognized and a certificate of attendance contributing towards CPD points.

Overview:

A health system consists of all organizations, people and actions whose primary intent is to promote, restore or maintain health. This includes efforts to influence determinants of health as well as more direct health-improving activities. A health system is therefore more than the pyramid of publicly owned facilities that deliver personal health services. It includes, for example, a mother caring for a sick child at home; private providers; behaviour change programmes; vector-control campaigns; health insurance organizations; occupational health and safety legislation. It includes inter-sectoral action by health staff, for example, encouraging the ministry of education to promote female education, a well-known determinant of better health.

The strategic importance of Strengthening Health Systems is absolute. The world has never possessed such a sophisticated arsenal of interventions and technologies for curing disease and prolonging life. Yet the gaps in health outcomes continue to widen. Much of the ill health, disease, premature death, and suffering we see on such a large scale are needless, as effective and affordable interventions are available for prevention and treatment. The reality is straightforward. The power of existing interventions is not matched by the power of health systems to deliver them to those in greatest need, in a comprehensive way, and on an adequate scale.

On present trends, the health-related Goals are the least likely to be met, despite the availability of powerful drugs, vaccines and other tools to support their attainment. The best measure of a health system’s performance is its impact on health outcomes. International consensus is growing: without urgent improvements in the performance of health systems, the world will fail to meet the health-related Goals. As just one example, the number of prostate cancer deaths has stayed stubbornly high despite more than a decade of efforts. This number will not fall significantly until better or more accurate biomarkers are identified for the early detection of the disease. As health systems are highly context-specific, there is no single set of best practices that can be put forward as a model for improved performance. But health systems that function well have certain shared characteristics. They have procurement and distribution systems that actually deliver interventions to those in need. They are staffed with sufficient health workers having the right skills and motivation.

Health outcomes are unacceptably low across much of the developing world, and the persistence of deep inequities in health status is a problem from which no country in the world is exempt. At the center of this human crisis is a failure of health systems. Much of the burden of disease can be prevented or cured with known, affordable technologies. The problem is getting drugs, vaccines, information and other forms of prevention, care or treatment – on time, reliably, in sufficient quantity and at reasonable cost – to those who need them. In too many countries the systems needed to do this are on the point of collapse, or are accessible only to particular groups in the population. Hence, there is an urgent need to improve the performance of health systems.

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CEME Conference Centre

Marsh Way

Rainham, United Kingdom

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