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The National Archives

Kew

London

TW9 4DU

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ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING AND CONFERENCE​​

Conserving Knowledge: Recording and Archiving the Historic Environment for Future Generations

at The National Archives, Kew on FRIDAY 6th MARCH 2020

What do we choose to record, why and for whom? How best do we do this and save the information? What is not being recorded and could be lost in the future? The 2020 ASCHB conference investigates these issues through not just traditional methods of recording but also new technologies and contemporary archiving practices, along with its new challenges. We shall consider how best to record and archive both artefacts and the built environment. Our speakers will consider current standards and traditional methods of recording with text, drawing and photography and the current transitions into the digital age by investigating the type and benefits of new technologies. We will discover contemporary archiving practices for digital material and reflect on the challenges involved in delivering the perfect archived record.

GENERAL PROGRAMME:

AGM registration begins at 9.00am. AGM is from 9:15–9:50 am and is free to all members.

Conference: Coffee and Conference registration from 9:30am, with the Conference from 10:00 until 17:00. Includes a buffet lunch, and morning coffee and afternoon tea.

Detailed programme and more information is available on the ASCHB Website: www.aschb.org.uk/conferences or if you have any questions, wish to pay by cheque, or for late bookings please contact: information@aschb.org.uk

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES

Carl Brookes is a Director at Ramboll and leads the Engineering Simulation Team. He has 35 years’ experience in the assessment and analysis of Civil, Building and Industrial structures. Although projects are broad ranging, Carl has a special interest in the application of digital technologies to the understanding of existing and heritage assets. Highlights have included modelling the timber hull of the Mary Rose, the structural assessment of The Iron Bridge, research for Historic England on BIM processes and hundreds of projects involving masonry arch bridges. The linking of reality capture technologies to numerical simulation, to more efficiently and more accurately predict behaviour has always been a common thread in Carl’s work

Tobit Curteis is an alumnus of the Courtauld Institute of Art’s postgraduate course in the conservation of wall paintings; in parallel with his work conserving wall paintings and the historic buildings in which they are found, he has spent more than twenty years developing innovative environmental surveying and monitoring techniques, and is a building performance consultant for many of the most important historic buildings in Britain. The managing partner of Tobit Curteis Associates LLP, Tobit is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and of the International Institute for Conservation, the Advisor on Wall Paintings for the National Trust, and a consultant and research collaborator for Historic England. He regularly publishes and lectures on environmental and conservation issues.

Peter Guillery is an architectural historian and editor for the Survey of London, the topographical series founded in 1894 that is now part of the Bartlett School of Architecture in University College London. His work for the Survey of London has covered areas ranging from Marylebone, to Clerkenwell, Whitechapel, Woolwich and the Isle of Dogs. Away from the Survey his publications include The Small House in Eighteenth-Century London (2004), Behind the Façade, London House Plans 1660-1840 (2006, with Neil Burton) and, as editor, Built from Below: British Architecture and the Vernacular (2011) and Mobilising Housing Histories: Learning from London’s Past (2017, with David Kroll). He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, and serves on the council of the London Topographical Society and the editorial board of the Georgian Group.

Julian Harrap Dip Arch RIBA FRSA was educated and undertook his architectural training in central London under the tutelage of Sir Lesley Martin, Sir James Stirling and Sir Colin St John Wilson. He established his own practice in 1973 and has developed a particular knowledge and understanding of the design, technology and materials employed in the conservation of historic buildings and landscapes. He is currently working on Horace Jones’s 1863 General Market and the 1958 Poultry Market for the New Museum of London in West Smithfield.

James Hepher is Senior Digital Documentation Officer at Historic Environment Scotland (HES) working primarily on the Rae Project – the 3D Digital Documentation of 336 HES Properties in Care and 36,000 objects and artefacts from the HES collections. James started out with HES as the Surveyor on the “Scottish Ten Project”, a 5-year venture to digitally document World Heritage Sites in 3D. Prior to this he was a Surveyor at RCAHMS surveying Scotland’s broad range of heritage from Bronze Age sites to Second World War bunkers. James’ professional areas of interest are Surveying, Archaeology, 3D Modelling, International Heritage, teaching & training.

Jean Letherby is the President of ASCHB, and is the website editor. She was an architect for many years with HOK specialising in conservation. Her projects included the refurbishment of the North West sector of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Whitehall, which encompassed the Locarno Suite of rooms, Natural History Museum South East Wing Roofs, Refurbishment of National Audit Office, Victoria, and input on the historic estate of Barts and the Royal London Hospital Trust. She acted as Conservation adviser to the Crown Estate for Regents Park and Kensington Palace Gardens estates, and as a client advisor on Department of Health and London Fire Brigade projects. Latterly she was Quality and Environmental Management Systems Manager for HOK.

Ingval Maxwell’s architectural career in Historic Scotland spanned 39 years, retiring in 2008. Past initiator and Chair of COST Action C17: Fire Loss to Historic Buildings, he has since acted as an EC Research Project and UNESCO World Heritage Site Expert Assessor. Currently, he is Chair of the Council on Training in Architectural Conservation; a Stone Federation Awards Judge, and a member of the RIBA Conservation Group. He was appointed a Fellow of the RIBA in December 2018.

Joe Thompson, a carpenter based at the Weald and Downland Museum in Singleton, West Sussex researches historic timber structures and the materials, tools and techniques involved in their construction. His work comprises both new-build and conservation and since the late 1990’s he has taught these skills to students at the Museum. These range from one to five day practical workshops through to lecturing on the Masters programmes in Building Conservation and Timber Building Conservation, as well as leading the Historic England Timber Building Conservation Masterclass at West Dean College, West Sussex.

He has developed the timber appraisal and repair techniques established at the Museum in the early 1990’s using digital technology to record and document a wide range of features visible on the historic timbers. His presentation will focus on what to record, how and why it is informative.

Dr Philippa Turner is Sector Development Manager for London and Business Archives within Archive Sector Development at The National Archives. Her work involves advising archive services and individuals or organisations that hold archival material on best practice, fostering collaboration, and, as part of the wider team within the department, encouraging sustainability and innovation within the archives sector. Her work contributes to The National Archives’ leadership role of the archives sector in England, and its fulfilment of its obligations under the Public Records Act and the Historical Manuscripts Commission Warrant. Philippa gained her PhD in History of Art at the University of York, where her thesis examined the evidence for devotional images in the late medieval interiors of Durham Cathedral Priory and York Minster; she has contributed to several publications on late medieval art history, and her co-edited volume (with Jane Hawkes, University of York), The Rood in Medieval Britain and Ireland, c.800-c.1500, will be published by Boydell & Brewer in 2020; a monograph based on her PhD is also in progress. Between her PhD and qualifying as an archivist, Philippa worked on the records of the restoration of the East Window of York Minster produced by York Glaziers Trust, and carried out recording and research for Lincoln Cathedral on its stained glass and its medieval sculpture.

Alexandra Valmarana is a consultant architect and former partner at Peregrine Bryant Architects, where she has worked in the conservation of historic buildings for over 20 years. She has led projects such as the Royal Astronomical Society at Burlington House, the Royal Hospital Chelsea, Belmont House, the Travellers Club, St Helen and St Katharine School, and many other Grade I and II buildings including work for the Landmark Trust, National Trust, UNESCO World Heritage sites, and the Crown Estate. She has worked internationally on projects in Jamaica, the USA, and in Italy, featuring recently in the documentary film on Palladio by Magnitudo Films. She continues to offer her expertise to the practice, while serving on the boards for the Centre for Palladian Studies in America, the Gloria and Marco Award following Grenfell, DITC Environmental Education Foundation, the Friends of the Georgian Society of Jamaica, and the ASCHB committee.

How To Find The National Archives At Kew

Address​: The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 4DU.

Driving: For sat navs use the postcode TW9 4AD (Bessant Drive). Parking availability is limited and delegates are strongly advised to use the train or bus. ParkingCharge: Up to two hours £2.50/ Up to four hours£4.50/ Over four hours £7.00

Train​: The nearest stations are Kew Gardens, which is served by the District tube line and the London Overground line, and Kew Bridge, served by South West Trains.

Bus: The R68 bus route (from Hampton Court via Rich: mond)terminates by the entrance to The National Archives. Other routes stopping nearby include:

65 (Ealing to Kingston via Richmond), alight on Kew Road near Victoria Gate (15-minute walk)

237 (Shepherd’s Bush to Hounslow Heath via Chiswick), alight at Kew Bridge (20-minute walk)

267 (Hammersmith to Fulwell via Brentford), alight at Kew Bridge (20-minute walk)

391 (Fulham to Richmond via Hammersmith), alight at Sandycombe Road near Kew Gardens station (10-minute walk)

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Date and Time

Location

The National Archives

Kew

London

TW9 4DU

United Kingdom

View Map

Refund Policy

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