The impact of anti-radicalisation policies on safeguarding practices

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Venue details will be announced here shortly

Room details will be announced here

London

United Kingdom

View Map

Event description
The impact of anti-radicalisation policies on safeguarding practices for children, young people and parents

About this Event

Please note that this event has been POSTPONED for 12 November and is currently planned for 28 January 2019. Final date will be confirmed shortly (via email)...

The Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 placed a duty on specified authorities to have due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism. This is known as the Prevent duty - and extends to protecting children from radicalisation.

This seminar will seek to explore the relationship between the aims of Prevent and child safeguarding practice; a key question is the suggestion of racial bias implicit in the aims and methods of the policy that affects institutions - in health, education and social care - interacting with and responsible for children. Therefore discussion of the issues arising is timely and important.

The seminar will hear contributions from two speakers, who will address the subject from their perspectives of practice and research in health and social care, and this will be followed by an open discussion.

This seminar will be of interest to practitioners, policy makers and academics/researchers, and social work students, including those required to implement the UK government's Prevent duty.

The seminar is hosted by the Centre for Social Work Research (CSWR), The Victoria Climbié Foundation UK (VCF) and the BME-Migrant Advisory Group for safeguarding children and young people (B-MAG).

The two speakers and the titles of their talks are as follows:

Dr Tarek Younis: Islamophobia in the National Health Service; How Prevent's Counter-Radicalisation Enters Into Clinical Logic

This presentation demonstrates how Prevent must engage in performance colour blindness - the active recognition and dismissal of racial logic which associates racialised Muslims with the threat of terrorism. It will also outline the chilling effect racialised and moralised policies (Prevent) have on NHS staff, especially British Muslims. It concludes with a discussion of how institutional racism is introduced and operates in the NHS, why it is difficult to address racism embedded within colour blind policies, and how mental health and psychologisation are integral to the performance of colour blindness.

Dr Tarek Younis is a cultural psychologist with a PhD/PsyD in Clinical Psychology. He is an Honorary Research Associate at University College London. His British Academy postdoctoral fellowship was an ethnography exploring the racialisation of statutory counter-terrorism policies (Prevent) in the NHS, and its impact on British Muslim mental health access. He researches and writes on Islamophobia, the securitisation and racism of mental health, and how counter-radicalisation enters into a clinical logic. He teaches on the impact of culture, religion, globalisation and security policies on psychological interventions.

Dr Jo Finch: Impact of Prevent on social work policy and practice

Dr Jo Finch is a Reader in Social Work at the University of East London and Deputy Director for the Centre of Social Work Research. Jo has a long standing research interest in practice education and assessment, with a focus on the management of struggling or failing student in practice learning settings. Jo's recent work has focused on the impact of Prevent on social work policy and practice.

Details of Jo's talk will follow soon.

We look forward to your contribution to this important debate

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

Venue details will be announced here shortly

Room details will be announced here

London

United Kingdom

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved