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Astbury 2018 Public Engagement Event and Lecture

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University of Leeds

Leeds

LS2 9JT

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Every living organism is made up of complex molecules, built from millions of atoms which perform all of the chemical reactions essential for life. During these reactions atoms change places and new molecules are formed. And it’s not just living organisms - understanding how atoms move and how molecules work are key to many areas including chemistry, physics, engineering and biological sciences. ‘The Secret Life of Molecules’ will give you an insight into this hidden world.

Find out for yourself some of the science behind aspects of daily life that we take for granted, and hear how the understanding that we are developing now could help shape the future.

3:45pm Exhibition opens with interactive displays; refreshments

4:30pm Lecture by Nobel Prize winner Professor Brian Kobilka - G protein coupled receptors: challenges for drug discovery

5:30pm Reception with food and wine, exhibition continues

Admission is free but you will need to reserve your place. Registration for this event will open in the Summer 2017.

If you have any queries, please contact Lucy Gray L.V.Gray@leeds.ac.uk .


Exhibition

Tuesday 17 April
Open from 3:45pm

Come along to our market place of interactive, hands-on activities and see demonstrations from the various Astbury disciplines of chemistry, physics and biological sciences. The 2016 event included a variety of exhibits including:

The Complex Life of Sugars - There’s a lot more to sugar than what you put in your tea. Every living cell is covered in a forest of complex carbohydrates that enable many biological processes from fertilisation to virus infection. Sugars play many roles in biology – see some of them for yourself

Liquid crystals: the phase of life - Liquid crystals are a phase of material between solids and liquids and found everywhere in biological systems. Your DNA, the cell membrane, a spider’s silk and reflective beetle shells are all liquid crystalline. Let us guide you through these systems, show you how they work and why they are so important in biology and technology.

From Dark Satanic Mills to DNA - ’Discover how, thanks to the humble wool fibre, Leeds has an important connection with one of the biggest scientific discoveries in history....

Proteins behaving badly - Many promising new drugs are therapeutic proteins, but some don't make it to market as they are hard to manufacture. Find out why

Protein Weaving - An interactive workshop which explores the structure and stability of proteins through the medium of weaving.

Enzymes: Just the right shape - Most enzymes function because of their particular shape at the nanoscale. See what happens when you change the shape of an enzyme.


Public Lecture - G protein coupled receptors: challenges for drug discovery by Nobel Laureate Brian Kobilka MD, Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

Tuesday 17 April 2018 at 4.30pm

Great Hall - University of Leeds

Following on from the Exhibition, Nobel Laureate Brian Kobilka MD, Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology at Stanford University School of Medicine will deliver a lecture drawing on his extensive experience in this area.

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University of Leeds

Leeds

LS2 9JT

United Kingdom

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