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Astbury 2018 Public Engagement Event and Lecture

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University of Leeds

Leeds

LS2 9JT

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Astbury Conversation 2018

The Astbury Conversation is designed to give an insight into life in molecular detail - whether you are a researcher wanting to know about the latest developments, or you are simply interested in learning more about the hidden - but fascinating – world of macromolecules. This event is inspired by the pioneering work at Leeds of the Braggs (Nobel prize 1913), and in the 1930s to 60s of Professor Bill Astbury, FRS, a field of research continued today in the Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology.

The Secret Life of Molecules - 17 April 2018

Every living organism is made up of complex molecules, built from millions of atoms which perform all of the chemical reactions essential for life. During these reactions atoms change places and new molecules are formed. And it’s not just living organisms - understanding how atoms move and how molecules work are key to many areas including chemistry, physics, engineering and biological sciences “Understanding More about the Secret Life of Molecules” will give you an insight into this hidden world.

Find out for yourself some of the science behind aspects of daily life that we take for granted, and hear how the understanding that we are developing now could help shape the future.

3:45pm Exhibition opens with interactive displays; refreshments

4:30pm Lecture by Nobel Prize winner Professor Brian Kobilka - G protein coupled receptors: challenges for drug discovery

5:30pm Reception with food and wine, exhibition continues

Admission is free but you will need to reserve your place. Registration for this event will open in the Summer 2017.

If you have any queries, please contact Lucy Gray L.V.Gray@leeds.ac.uk

Exhibition

Tuesday 17 April - Parkinson Court

Open from 3:45pm

Come along to our market place of interactive, hands-on activities and see demonstrations from the various Astbury disciplines of chemistry, physics and biological sciences. Exhibits include:

Fighting antimicrobial resistance - The high level of antibiotics use has led to a dramatic rise in drug resistant infections with frequent reports in the international press of looming catastrophes. Researcher in Leeds are developing a diagnostic to detect specific proteins in blood samples that can distinguish between viral and bacterial infections. In this way they use our own bodies responses to an infection to determine whether antibiotics, which do not help against viral infections, are necessary.

Enzymes make the world go round - Enzymes are biological machines present in all living things. They speed up chemical reactions and help our bodies turn food into energy. Enzymes can also aid us with our everyday needs, for example, washing powders containing enzymes are more effective. In this activity, you will see several enzymes in action!

The Superposition - The Superposition is a Leeds-based network for artists, makers and scientists to collaborate. We will exhibit a selection of bioscience-inspired art that has come to fruition through this network, with cross-length scale inspiration from membrane-deforming complexes and 3D protein networks to the architecture and mechanics of the cell, the mathematical principles that govern growth, symbiosis and the underpinning thermodynamic principles of life.

The Complex Life of Sugars - There is much more to sugar than the white crystals you put in your tea! We will explain the many roles of complex sugars in biology and medicine.

Seeing is believing: Cool Microscopy at Leeds - The University of Leeds is home to two of the most powerful electron microscopes in the world for studying proteins and cells. While the microscopes themselves are huge, more than 4m high, they allow us to look at microscopic proteins and viruses with enough detail to see their individual building blocks. Come and see for yourself how this world class equipment is helping us tackle some of the biggest challenges of our time, including antibiotic resistance, cancer, dementia and more.

ReAction - Design. Discover. Develop. - Design reactions of building blocks. Discover what’s active. Develop your ideas to find the perfect match. ReAction simulates Activity-Directed Synthesis; the new evolutionary approach for the discovery of bioactive small molecules.

Public Lecture - G protein coupled receptors: challenges for drug discovery by Nobel Laureate Brian Kobilka MD, Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

Tuesday 17 April - Great Hall

4.30pm

Following on from the Exhibition, Nobel Laureate Brian Kobilka MD, Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology at Stanford University School of Medicine will deliver a lecture drawing on his extensive experience in this area.

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LS2 9JT

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