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Block 3: Qualitative and Humanistic Research Methods

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Canterbury Christ Church University

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Canterbury

CT1 1QU

United Kingdom

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PLEASE NOTE THAT ROOM INFORMATION FOR ALL BOOKINGS IS FOUND ON THE RDP BOOKINGS OUTLOOK CALENDAR. WHEN YOU ENROL IN A SESSION YOU WILL RECEIVE AN OUTLOOK CALENDAR INVITE. please contact rdpbookings@canterbury.ac.uk if you do not receive an invitation.

S1 Interviewing 1 - Dr Patricia Driscoll - Thursday 15th November 2018, 11am-12.30pm.

Differentiate between different types of interviewing.


S2 Ethnography: Exploring Observations, Access and Ethics - Dr Steve Tong - Thursday 22nd November 2018, 11am-12.30pm

This session will discuss the use of observation as a research methodology and how this approach fits within a wider ethnographic strategy. The lecture will discuss challenges and responses to gaining access. Using examples from criminal justice, this presentation will explore ethical challenges to researchers.


S3 Interpreting data and constructing theory - Professor Shane Blackman - Tuesday 11th December 2018, 1-2.30pm

What do you do once you have collected the data? This session looks at ways to interpret qualitative data including participant observation and interview data. I shall focus on how to move from the descriptive to the analytical, to show how we can construct theory from empirical data.


S4 Feminist Research Methods - Professor Shane Blackman - Tuesday 15th January 2019, 1-2.30pm

There will be a critical assessment of feminist perspectives to research, which explores what is distinctive about feminist epistemologies and feminist research methods. To address the political nature of feminism focused on the transformation of gender relation through a critical assessment of women’s oppression, subordination, domination and resistance in patriarchy. I shall look at the place of feminisms and reflexivity in contemporary popular culture and queer theory


S5 Interviewing 2 - Professor Shane Blackman - Wednesday 12th February 2019, 3pm-4.30pm

This session looks at interviewing as a social research method, examining its history, the popularity of the research tool in journalism and TV and its theoretical basis. There will be a practical feature during the session focused on different interview methods/skills related: structured, semi-structured and conversational ethnographic interviews. We shall also examine what you do with interview transcript and how to present interview data within the thesis.


S6 Postcolonial Discourse Analysis - Dr Ruth Sanz-Sabido - Thursday 21st February 2019, 9am-10.30am

Based on an historical analysis of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the British press, this session examines the tenets of Postcolonial Critical Discourse Analysis as a methodological tool. Researchers interested in combining quantitative and qualitative approaches may find this session useful, as would those exploring samples spanning over a period of time.


S7 Working with Texts: Critical Discourse Analysis - Dr Alexandra Polyzou - Tuesday 5th March 2019, 3pm-4.30pm

This session introduces participants to Critical Discourse Analysis. Participants will be introduced to a general overview of CDA including key elements of Norman Fairclough’s work. Participants can bring along their own data to analyse as part of the workshop. The theoretical underpinnings of the approach will be explored


S8 Judgment criteria and research representation - Dr James Brighton - Thursday 14th March 2019, 9am-10.30am

  • Introduce students to different forms of judgment criteria in qualitative research
  • Understand need for other criteria beyond validity and reliability

S9 Ethnography - Professor Shane Blackman - Tuesday 9th April 2019, 10am-4pm

This session is focused on supplying you will a map of the tradition of Ethnography, which is both historical and contemporary. We shall examine key approaches within ethnography looking at landmark studies and discuss the critical relevance these works for undertaking qualitative research now. The session is concerned with how to do research in the real, to understand the successes and assess the difficulties you may encounter. So I shall also focus on ethnographic practice and the tools of the method: doing ethnographic fieldwork, from observation to interviewing as conversation, writing the field diary, assessing naturalistic assumptions alongside reflexivity, thick description and grounded theory.


S10 Using auto/biographical and narrative methods in research: generating, analysing and representing life stories, PART 1 - Professor Linden West - Thursday 16th May 2019, 11am-4pm. NB: participants must commit to attending both sessions.

These two interlinked workshops will provide a detailed introduction to using such approaches in a range of settings and covering diverse topics. The workshops are suitable both for new doctoral as well as experienced researchers, or the just interested, from a range of backgrounds and disciplines. Linden will explore how we can best generate narrative and life story material, using an experiential approach; and then work through to transcribing, and analysing narratives, using interdisciplinary perspectives. He will consider different approaches to representing lives and or narrative material, and consider the role and identity of the researcher in the process. Who are we, scientists, historians, novelists, poets, therapists or what?


S11 Using auto/biographical and narrative methods in research: generating, analysing and representing life stories, PART 2 - Professor Linden West - Thursday 23rd May 2019 11am-4pm. NB: participants must commit to attending both sessions.

These two interlinked workshops will provide a detailed introduction to using such approaches in a range of settings and covering diverse topics. The workshops are suitable both for new doctoral as well as experienced researchers, or the just interested, from a range of backgrounds and disciplines. Linden will explore how we can best generate narrative and life story material, using an experiential approach; and then work through to transcribing, and analysing narratives, using interdisciplinary perspectives. He will consider different approaches to representing lives and or narrative material, and consider the role and identity of the researcher in the process. Who are we, scientists, historians, novelists, poets, therapists or what?


S12 Intuition and imagination as research methodologies - Dr Angela Voss - Thursday 6th June 2019, 11am-12.30pm

In this session we will explore how intuition and imagination can be used as tools to ‘unlock’ creative approaches to research material. Methods such as intuitive, organic or holistic enquiry take the researcher into account, and can form bridges between ‘objective’ critical stances and experiential participation. They can also point the researcher towards ‘transpersonal’ dimensions of their study, where the topics are located within a bigger picture of human potential, and may have transformative effects. We will look at the work of Rosemarie Anderson, Jeffrey Kripal, John Dirkx and others who are proposing new integrative approaches to research and scholarship, and discuss their relevance to humanities research.


S13 Fictional truths and truths about fiction: using our imaginations to analyse our research data - Dr Wilma Fraser - Tuesday 4th June 2019, 1.15-4.45pm

What credence can we give to the kinds of ‘truths’ we purport to find in our research? Are they ‘out there’, to be discovered, mined, excavated, and brought into the light through careful exegesis and analysis? Or, are they somehow wrought into being in response to our own needs, predispositions, and anxieties? This session will draw upon the use of ‘writing as inquiry’ (Richardson, 1997) and explore the potential for using fiction as a means of interpreting and analysing our interview material. A step too far? Or a liberatory way of pushing at the boundaries of qualitative methodologies and, thence, deepening and enhancing our findings?


S14 Using Social Media Data for Research - Professor Agnes Gulyas - 26th February 2019, 1pm-2.30pm

Social media might be a way not only of disseminating your research output but also of collecting import data for your research. Colleagues who have used Social Media as a tool for data collection will share their experience and guide discussions on how you might find these tools useful for your own research.


S15 Policy & Media Analysis- Dr Jennie Bristow- Tuesday 4th December 2018, 11am-12.30pm

This session will provide researcher with an introduction to techniques of policy and media analysis


S16 Multimodality/Visual Analysis - Dr Alexandra Polyzou, Tuesday 7th May 2019, 3pm-4.30pm

The session will draw on social semiotics and explore modes of communication beyond language, focusing on visual analysis (including compositional analysis) and the linguistic-visual interplay (relay and anchorage). Sound (non-linguistic) and movement will also be touched upon.



Please note that our sessions are available to Christ Church University staff and students only. You must register for an event with a CCCU email account to attend.

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Canterbury Christ Church University

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Canterbury

CT1 1QU

United Kingdom

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