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"Book launch extravaganza!" hosted by Positive Communities Research Group,...

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MMU Brooks Building

53 Bonsall St, Manchester M15 6GX Bonsall Street

Manchester

M15 6GX

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You are warmly invited to our book launch extravaganza hosted by the Positive Communities Research Group in the Faculty for Health, Psychology & Social Care at Manchester Metropolitan University.

Date: 31st October, 2017

Time: 4pm - 6pm

Venue: Room BR G.78 - Lecture Theatre 1, Brooks Building, Birley Campus, Manchester Metropolitan University

Tea/coffee will be available on arrival and we invite you to join the authors for a glass of wine at 6.00pm.

If you have any questions about this event please contact Katherine Runswick-Cole: k.runswick-cole@mmu.ac.uk

The unique event will be chaired by Andrew Cozens CBE, a leading national social care and health policy analyst and improvement specialist. Andrew sits on the boards of MHA (and chairs its Quality Committee).

The event will celebrate the publication of six exciting new books in the area of disability studies, psychology and sociology.

More about the books ...

Simon Cramp – Don’t Cramp My Style (Centre for Welfare Reform)

Simon’s book is a journey through learning disability history over the last 30 years. This history is explored through one man’s eyes, incorporating emotional reflections on family life and accounts of Simon’s personal impact on organisations and policy surrounding people with a learning disability. Simon’s own words are bolstered by contributions from family and colleagues, the excerpt below sums up ‘Don’t Cramp My Style’

“Simon Cramp is today one of the most well-known figures on the national stage with, as we now say, “lived experience “ of learning disability. He is knowledgeable, articulate and able to hold his own in conversation – occasionally heated discussion – with government officials and ministers. Under the terms of the 1944 Education Act, passed in living memory, he might well have been considered “uneducable”.

His book is idiosyncratic, emotional (especially when he discusses his late and beloved twin brother, Adrian) and frankly a touch disorganised. Very much like Simon himself. If you’re looking for a scholarly tome on learning disability, put it down now. But if you want a fascinating insight into one man’s acceptance of his disability, and his mission to make things better not just for himself but for hundreds of thousands of others, read on.” - David Brindle the Guardian.

Jennifer Hawkins (2017) Feelings and Emotion Based Learning: A New Theory (Palgrave MacMillan)

This book explores academic learning theories in relation to modern cognitive research. It suggests that developing a feelings and emotion-based learning theory could improve our understanding of human learning behaviour. Jennifer A. Hawkins argues that feelings are rational in individuals' own terms and should be considered—whether or not we agree with them. She examines learners' experiences and posits that feelings and emotions are logical to individuals according to their current beliefs, memories, and knowledge. This volume provides rich case studies and empirical data and shows that acknowledging feelings during and after learning experiences helps to solve cognitive difficulties, aid motivation and self-reflection. It also demonstrates ways to record and analyse feelings to provide useful research evidence.

Kirsty Liddiard (2018) The Intimate Lives of Disabled People. (Routledge)

Disabled people are routinely assumed to lack the capabilities and capacities to embody and experience sexuality and desire, as well as the agency to love and be loved by others, and build their own families, if they so choose. Centring on the sexual, intimate and erotic lives of disabled people, this book presents a rare opportunity to understand and ask critical questions about such widely held assumptions.

In essence, this book is a collection of sexual stories, told by disabled people on their own terms and in their own ways. Stories that shed light on areas of disability, love and life that are typically overlooked and ignored. A sociological analysis of these stories reveals the creative ways in which disabled people manage and negotiate their sexual and intimate lives in contexts where these are habitually denied. In its calls for disabled people’s sexual and intimate citizenship, stories are drawn upon as the means to create social change and build more radically inclusive sexual cultures.

In this exciting feminist critical disability studies text, The Intimate Lives of Disabled People introduces and contributes to contemporary debates around disability, sexuality and intimacy in the 21st century. Its arguments are relevant and accessible to researchers, academics, and students across a wide range of disciplines – such as sociology, gender studies, psychology, social work, and philosophy – as well as disabled people, their families and allies, and the professionals who work with and for them.

Sarah Parry (2017) Effective Self-Care and Resilience in Clinical Practice Dealing with Stress Compassion Fatigue and Burnout (Jessica Kingsley Publishers)

Combining a number of examples from a variety of practices, including clinical psychology, consultancy, and nursing, each chapter explores how compassion can influence therapeutic work and improve practitioner wellbeing. Topics include stress-resilience, the nature of self-care, self-compassion or self-criticism, and supervision in therapeutic practice.

Following an accessible review of relevant literature from the editor, these stories offer guidance and ideas for practitioners to prioritise their wellbeing in order to navigate organisational challenges, overcome barriers to self-care, and develop a compassionate framework for practice, contributing to a more rewarding experience for all.

Katherine Runswick-Cole, Tillie Curran and Kirsty Liddiard (2017) (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Disabled Children’s Childhood Studies, (Palgrave MacMillan)

Disabled children’s lives have often been discussed through medical concepts of disability rather than concepts of childhood. Western understandings of childhood have defined disabled children against child development ‘norms’ and have provided the rationale for segregated or ‘special’ welfare and education provision. In contrast, disabled children’s childhood studies begins with the view that studies of children’s impairment are not studies of their childhoods. Disabled children’s childhood studies demands ethical research practices that position disabled children and young people at the centre of the inquiry outside of the shadow of perceived ‘norms’.

The Palgrave Handbook of Disabled Children’s Childhood Studies will be of interest to students and scholars across a range of disciplines, as well as practitioners in health, education, social work and youth work.

Sara Ryan (2017) Justice for Laughing Boy: Connor Sparrowhawk – a death by indifference (Jessica Kingsley Publishers)

On July 4th 2013, Connor Sparrowhawk, also known as Laughing Boy or LB, was found dead in a specialist NHS unit. Connor, who had autism and epilepsy, had a seizure while in the bath and no member of staff was on hand to stop him from drowning. An entirely preventable death.

Connor's mother Sara Ryan tells the touching story of her remarkable son's early life, then premature death. She articulates the harrowing experience of not only losing a child, but then having to fight to discover the truth about the circumstances of his death. Following Connor's death, Sara and others start the dynamic #JusticeforLB campaign to highlight the injustice of Connor's death. It quickly gains momentum and becomes a rallying cry not only for Connor, but for the many other injustices learning disabled adults experience, leading to high-profile inquiries which uncover shocking rates of premature death among this group.

Justice for Laughing Boy tells a very uncomfortable truth about the experiences of people with learning disabilities in inpatient settings today. It serves as a wake-up call to all of us and asks: can we really claim that we respect the life and dignity of learning disabled people?



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MMU Brooks Building

53 Bonsall St, Manchester M15 6GX Bonsall Street

Manchester

M15 6GX

United Kingdom

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