Free

Book Review & Discussion : Peak

Actions and Detail Panel

Free

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Online Event

Event description
Secrets from the New Science of Expertise

About this Event

In this event, you’ll learn

  • Why everyone can acquire perfect pitch
  • How deliberate practice makes your brain larger – literally
  • What makes London cab drivers skilled, deliberate practitioners
  • How mental representations let you bypass short-term memory
  • Why baseball professionals don’t have to think when they’re on the field

About the Author

K. ANDERS ERICSSON, PhD, is Conradi Eminent Scholar and professor of psychology at Florida State University. He studies expert performance in domains such as music, chess, medicine, and sports. His groundbreaking work has been cited in bestsellers from Moonwalking with Einstein to Outliers to How Children Succeed. He lives in Florida.

ROBERT POOL, PhD, is a science writer living and working in Tallahassee, Florida. He has worked at some of the world’s most prestigious science publications, including Science and Nature, and his work has appeared in many others, including Discover and Technology Review. He has written three books, including Eve’s Rib: Searching for the Biological Roots of Sex Differences and Beyond Engineering: How Society Shapes Technology.

Overview

Perfect pitch can be trained if you get the kids early enough. By exposing them to tones and challenging them to match them before age 4, they can develop perfect pitch for the rest of their life. Even adults can learn some of this, though there is some brain plasticity at that young age that makes it easier.

The central message: The right sort of practice carried out over a sufficient period of time leads to improvement. Nothing else. There is no such thing as natural talent or prodigies. Anders spends most of the book explaining what “the right sort of practice” is, as well as why talent doesn’t exist. But it comes back to this central message, that anyone can improve, and that it takes time. The only shortcut is practicing the right way. If you don’t buy the “no talent” thing, please buy the book, he has a whole chapter on it.

A common learning obstacle: If you reach a skill level that feels “satisfactory” to you, you stop improving, and even get worse with time. Just playing tennis for fun with your friends won’t get you much better, since you’re not pushing yourself. The more “automated” your performance has become, the less you’re learning.

The Five Big Ideas

  • People aren’t born with fixed reserves of potential; instead, potential is an expandable vessel, shaped by the various things we do throughout our lives.
  • The right sort of practice carried out over a sufficient period of time leads to improvement. Nothing else.
  • Once you reach a level of “acceptable” performance and automaticity, the additional years of “practice” don’t lead to improvement.
  • The goal, with deliberate practice, is not just to reach your potential but to build it, to make things possible that were not possible before.
  • Much of deliberate practice involves developing ever more efficient mental representations
Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

Online Event

Save This Event

Event Saved