Carnegie School of Sport Celebrating International Women’s Day

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Leeds Beckett University

Headingley Campus

Jubilee Room

Leeds

LS6 3QU

United Kingdom

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International Women's Day is celebrated in many countries around the world. It is a day when women are recognised for their achievements. It is also a day when the value of women’s sport is highlighted. The Carnegie School of Sport has a distinguished history of putting its underpinning principles of equality and social justice in sport into practice. Our work is multidisciplinary, rigorous and made accessible for a range of audiences.

On International Women’s Day the Carnegie School of Sport are celebrating their longstanding commitment to #BalanceforBetter by hosting a carnegieXchange event that showcases our women’s sport research with Dr Leanne Norman, Dr Stacey Emmonds, Dr Hayley Fitzgerald and Dr Annette Stride, followed by an Alumni Talk by Dr Mel Lang (Edge Hill University) who is making a positive difference to child protection in sport.

All sessions will be held in the Jubilee Room, Headingley Campus.

10:00 - 10:30 Tea/Coffee on arrival

10:30 - 10:40 Welcome to the carnegieXchange Carousel of Research with Impact in Women’s Football Professor Susan Backhouse (Director of Research)

10:40 - 11:10 Dr Leanne Norman

11:10 - 11:40 Dr Stacey Emmonds

11:40 - 12:10 Dr Hayley Fitzgerald & Dr Annette Stride

12:10 - 12:30 Moderated panel discussion

12:30 - 13:30 Lunch (Jubilee Room)

13:30 - 13:40 Welcome to the carnegieXchange Alumni Talk Emeritus Professor Anne Flintoff

13:40 - 14:45 Safeguarding and child protection in youth sport: Discovery, prevention and challenges Dr Mel Lang, Edge Hill University

14:45 - 16:00 Drinks reception

carnegieXchange Carousel of Research with Impact in Women’s Football

Dr Leanne Norman, Dr Stacey Emmonds, Dr Hayley Fitzgerald, Dr Annette Stride

Women’s participation in football represents one of the fastest growing trends within sport in the recent years. The rise in participant numbers, the development of performance and professional opportunities, and an increase in the supporter base have helped to remove some of the social stigma attached to playing and normalise women’s position in what has historically been a male-dominated sport. Nevertheless, there is still some way to go to match this growth with for example, a specific understanding of the maturation of female players, of how different groups of women experience the game, and removing the “risk” that women are often perceived as, to be considered for coaching and leadership positions. Here in the Carnegie School of Sport, we are one of the leading institutions in the country for contributing research and evidence towards impacting the development of women’s football at all levels. We would like to invite colleagues to listen to and join in discussions about the ways that we are changing women’s football, from participation, to performance, to coaching. Therefore, we are delighted to announce that, to coincide with International Women’s Day on Friday 8th March, we will be hosting our first “Research with Impact @Carnegie” event. The workshop will focus on women’s football and celebrate the research we are leading within the School in this area. Presenters Dr Stacey Emmonds, Dr Annette Stride, Dr Hayley Fitzgerald, and Dr Leanne Norman will be discussing the work they are carrying out to contribute change towards developing football for and by women. There will also be the opportunity for colleagues in attendance to consider and debate what needs to be done further, to ensure that women’s football continues to build on its growing profile and how the Carnegie School of Sport can remain at the heart of those developments.

Dr Leanne Norman

Leanne is a Reader in Sports Coaching within the Carnegie School of Sport at Leeds Beckett University. She is an internationally recognised researcher for her research and writing within the area of gender equality and issues of diversity related to sports coaching, sports leadership, and organisations. Her work is driven towards improving the participation, performance, and leadership pathways for diverse social groups, principally, different groups of women. Leanne has written for academic and practitioner textbooks, written educational resources for coaches, and has published widely in academic journals related to sport and social issues. She has led national and international research projects as well as acted as academic expert and consultant for research funded by sport councils, governing bodies, and charities. Leanne utilises such research as the evidence for impactful activities including leading the delivery of programmes towards supporting women to enhance their experience of sports coaching as a credible and valuable profession, as well as working with organisations to support them towards creating a diverse leadership and coaching workforce.​

Leanne's presentation will focus on on the three year programme of research being led on behalf of the English Football Association by the Carnegie School of Sport. This series of projects centre on the changing experiences of female football coaches and how these experiences relate to the organisational and club structures in which the coaches operate. The talk will outline the approach to the programme of work, how they link together, and the impact that has already arisen from the research on the ways that The FA approach the recruitment and development of both women coaches and coaches working in women's football. The research has focused on tracking individual coaches' experiences over three years, understanding coaches' experiences of programmes such as The FA Elite Coach Mentee Programme and the National Specialist Coach Programme, and has undertaken assessments of the cultural climates of elite clubs within the top two tiers of women's football in England. The key findings that have arisen from the work so far and how these have informed organisational interventions, will be discussed.

Dr Stacey Emmonds

Dr Stacey Emmonds is a Senior Lecturer in Sports Coaching. Her main areas of teaching and research are in the areas of youth athletic development as well as the match and training demands of youth athletes. Stacey's current research focuses on on the performance characteristics of youth female soccer players. Stacey also has extensive applied experience within elite sport. She spent 6 years at Leeds United boys academy where she was Head of Sport Science as well as spending 2 years as Head of Sport Science for Doncaster Rovers Belles in the Women's Super League. She is currently the lead strength and conditioning coach for England Women's rugby league squad, supporting them prior to and during both the 2013 and 2017 World Cup and is currently a consultant physical performance coach for the Football Association (FA) on the girls England Talent Pathway.

Stacey will talk about the current lack of research in elite female sport and the challenges of applying applied sport science and sports medicine research from male to female cohorts. Specifically, she will discuss this in the context of women's football and highlight the need to develop an evidence base specific to female players to further help in developing current practices and strategies for the athletic development of female football players on the England Talent Pathway.

Dr Hayley Fitzgerald

Hayley Fitzgerald is a Reader in Disability and Youth Sport at Leeds Beckett University and a Visiting Professor at the University of Worcester. Hayley’s teaching and research reflects an on-going commitment to explore the inequalities experienced by young people with disabilities in physical education and youth sport. Methodologically, Hayley’s research has adopted a participatory student-centred approach in order to enable young people with multiple and severe disabilities to take a meaningful part in research. Theoretically, her work engages in a process of reconceptualising social model critiques of disability and notions of inclusion. Both of these features of her work provide alternative ways of understanding young people with disabilities as they negotiate participating in physical education and youth sport. Hayley has undertaken research and developed coach education resources for a range of organisations including the Youth Sport Trust, English Federation of Disability Sport, the Football Association and UK Coaching.

Dr Annette Stride

Annette joined Leeds Beckett University in September 2007 and is a Principal Lecturer and Course Director overseeing the provision of Physical Education undergraduate and postgraduate degree programmes. Prior to this she worked in further education and held the position of Head of Physical Education, Recreation and Public Services position at Bradford College. In 2012 Annette completed her PhD ‘Telling Tales of Difference? Exploring South Asian, Muslim Girls’ Experiences of Physical Education and Physical Activity.' Annette continues to research in the area of social justice where her work typically focuses upon populations that experience marginalisation, discrimination or disadvantage in PE, sport and physical activity contexts. Annette recently led the ‘Gender, PE and Active Lifestyles’ conference. She was a guest editor for the international journal Sport, Education and Society for a double special edition focusing on ‘Gender, physical education and active lifestyles: contemporary challenges and new directions.

​‘Last goal wins’: re/engaging women of a ‘forgotten’ age through football

Hayley and Annette's presentation explores the physical activity experiences of a group of women based in England, and who are over the age of 30. This particular age group represent a ‘forgotten’ age, that is, they are largely ignored in academic scholarship, policy and physical activity provision. The presentation will explore how this group of women ‘re/engaged’ in physical activity after a sustained period of inactivity. The study is situated in a weekly football initiative (Monday Night Footy) based in the north of England, managed and organised by a group of women for women to train and play five-a- side football. From these women’s stories three key findings emerge: (a) Biographies of (in)activity – the ways in which relationships with physical activity can be characterised by fractures and fissures despite seemingly positive early physical activity experiences; (b) Pathways of re/engagement – the motives and enablers to these women once again participating in physical activity after a sustained absence; and (c) Monday Night Footy as a space for re/engagement – the ways in which this context contributes to these women’s continued involvement in football and broader physical activity. We conclude by offering policy makers and physical activity providers with some recommendations alongside considerations for future research.

carnegieXchange Alumni Talk

Dr Mel Lang completed her PhD at Leeds Beckett University in 2005 and joined Edge Hill University as a senior lecturer in child protection in sport. Her work focuses on the policy and practice of implementing and embedding child protection in sport and she works closely with several National Governing Bodies of sport, coach education providers, Sport England and the NSPCC Child Protection in Sport Unit. She has been involved in projects funded by the European Commission Education, Audio-visual and Culture Executive Agency, Sport England, the Japanese government, and the German Sport Youth/German Olympic Committee, and is a member of the UK Coaching Safeguarding Talented and Elite Children Expert Group and the Council of Europe European Union pool of experts on sexual violence in sport. Her latest edited collection, The Routledge Handbook of Athlete Welfare, is due in 2020.

Mel will talk about Children’s participation in sport is generally regarded as beneficial, a component of a healthy childhood and a long adulthood. However, research has also identified the existence of child maltreatment in sport. Consequently, many countries have in recent years expanded child protection regulations to encompass sport and physical activity settings. This presentation overviews the history of child protection in sport in the UK through to contemporary developments in research, policy and prevention. In doing so, it also highlights key gaps in our understanding and challenges encountered by researchers working in the area.


Date and Time

Location

Leeds Beckett University

Headingley Campus

Jubilee Room

Leeds

LS6 3QU

United Kingdom

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