CEID Seminar Series 2017/18: Health, Wellbeing and International Developmen...

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UCL Institute of Education

Drama Studio, Level 1, 20 Bedford Way

London

WC1H 0AL

United Kingdom

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CEID SEMINAR SERIES - 2017/18 - SEMINAR 5

Health, Wellbeing and International Development Roundtable discussion

For this roundtable, four key presentations will highlight the importance of understanding and engaging with the lived experiences of children, young people and adults with regard to their own and others’ perceptions of health and wellbeing.

Rodney Reynolds will focus on understandings of food and families, and how perceptions and anxieties of what to feed a family change over time. From her doctoral work, Sophia Mark will discuss the accounts of women in Jos, Nigeria, who are living with HIV and whether the idea of ‘biographical disruption’ is useful in making sense of the ways that HIV has affected their lives. Also from her doctoral work, Maria Ramirez Angel will highlight the forms of communication between parents and ‘digital orphans’ and how emotions are shaped by, and come to shape, the use of digital communication technologies. Tricia Young and Carolyn Conway will report on the experiences of Child to Child in actively engaging children in health-related issues, so enabling them to take action to promote health and wellbeing. The seminar will be chaired by Dr. Ian Warwick, UCL Institute of Education.

The four 20-25 minute presentations are:


My Husband Never Did That!

Dr Rodney Reynolds - Institute for Global Health, Faculty of Pop Health Sciences

A modification of Arjun Appadurai’s concept of the ‘scape’, foodscapes have featured as an important analytical tool in urban health and food sovereignty studies. While these often focus on distinctions between access and exposure to food within a given food environment, less attention has been paid to anxieties generated by the need to acquire the food fed to families, how women describe their experience and how these change over the lifecourse. This paper will present some ideas that have emerged out of research conducted in Mexico City about being overweight and obesity between 2015 and 2017.


‘A raw experience’: Biographical Disruption in a group of women living with HIV/AIDS in Jos, Nigeria:

Sophia Mark – Doctoral student, UCL Institute of Education

The research explored the lived experience of a group of Nigerian women living with HIV/AIDS in Jos, Northern Nigeria and argued that Bury (1982)’s notion of biographical disruption offers a useful framework for conceptualizing the Nigerian participants’ experience of living with HIV. Participants were invited to discuss the following issues in relation to women’s lives and HIV:

  • Experiences of living with HIV
  • Effects of HIV on understandings of identity
  • Living with and coming to terms with HIV


Digital Orphans and Childless Parents: an overview of transnational families’ relationships.

Maria Ramirez Angel – Doctoral student, UCL Anthropology

Maria Angel’s project aims to establish an account of the digital practices between transnational parents and the children they leave behind and how these practices alter the ways they express emotions and communicate at distance. These methods of communication, in turn, affect how the parents construct and frame their new experiences and their existing familial relationship.


Children as Agents of Change

Tricia Young and Carolyn Conway, Child to Child

We will present case studies of Child to Child programmes where children have played an active role in promoting the health and wellbeing of themselves, their peers and wider communities. We will explore recent initiatives in Sierra Leone, Uganda and the UK and the changes that children have brought about as a consequence of their engagement in issues ranging from:

  • Responding to the needs of children impacted by the Ebola crisis
  • Promoting inclusive education of children with disabilities
  • Promoting empowerment of children marginalised from mainstream education in London

The seminar is free to attend, and open to all.

Please contact ceid@ucl.ac.uk if you have any questions

Date and Time

Location

UCL Institute of Education

Drama Studio, Level 1, 20 Bedford Way

London

WC1H 0AL

United Kingdom

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