£57.35 – £157.19

Change in the City: Opportunities for Architects in the New Urban Agenda

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Royal Institute of British Architects

66 Portland Place

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W1B 1AD

United Kingdom

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CHANGE IN THE CITY: OPPORTUNITIES FOR ARCHITECTS IN THE NEW URBAN AGENDA

Every 20 years, the UN stages a global summit to which 30,000 visitors attend and 10,000 actively participate to outline, debate and agree the key issues affecting housing and sustainable urbanisation over the next two decades.

The third United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN Habitat) conference was held in Quito, Ecuador, in October 2016, at which the draft plan, the New Urban Agenda, was adopted. Discussing city-making topics as wide and varied as migration and security to housing, urban mobility and social cohesion, mayors, political leaders and urbanists came together to debate and agree a global strategy.

The architecture profession, however, was scantly represented. Yet architects can offer much in the creation of 21st century worldwide cities. This conference will explain just what the New Urban Agenda is and look at the role architects can play in building the good city. It will present the perspective of politicians and architects, explore how architects can contribute to creating a cohesive society, innovate to alleviate the housing crisis whilst protecting cultural and natural heritage.

Conference overview:

9.00: Registration

9.30: The New Urban Agenda: a guide for the perplexed. We highlight the key issues from this vast document, and explain how they will affect architects and the profession and where the opportunities are.

10.30: The politician’s perspective: the future for cities. Architects, of course, think that they can play a key role creating the future city but given so few attended the United Nations summit, do prominent figures from the sectors who did actually attend agree?

12.00: The architect’s perspective: their role and the opportunities. Leading international architects discuss how they think their skills can be better used in city making. Is it at a macro level, or via individual buildings? At what point in the process should architects intervene to best use their skills? If early, how do they start such conversations? What building types are growth markets? And should architects be involved in ethics and morals given as a profession they have no training in sociology and politics?

The afternoon examines 3 key opportunities that the RIBA has highlighted from the New Urban Agenda.

14:00: A sense of belonging: how to create a cohesive society. From both an architectural and sociological perspective, we examine what building types will encourage social cohesion within the future city, and ask if new kinds of buildings are necessary for our changing society? We also look at whether the way a building is designed and constructed can facilitate a sense of belonging. Are there ways of building more inclusively to prevent people feeling so alienated from their neighbourhoods? Can you measure social cohesion?

15:15 Housing: opportunities for architects to innovate. Unable to affect land value, architects are only able to answer two fundamental questions: firstly, are we collectively designing the right kind of homes to deal with our changing society as we live for longer and land prices continue to rise? And secondly, can architects improve the supply of housing? Will prefabrication truly ever offer a solution? And with the migrant crisis shining a spotlight on relief housing, is this an area where architects could make an impact?

17.00 Cultural heritage: unlock economic and community value. Protecting the world’s cultural and natural heritage is one of the aims of the New Urban Agenda. But what does the term heritage mean today, and across different cultures around the world? We discuss how architects can make heritage work for the future both economically and socially by protecting local character and skills in an era of globalisation.

CPD

The conference is RIBA CPD Certified worth 9 hours of structured CPD. The assigned topics from the RIBA CPD Core Curriculum that this conference will cover are:

• Climate: sustainable architecture. Designing and building it: structural design, construction, technology and engineering. Where people live: communities, urban and rural design and the planning process. Context – the historic environment and its setting

Your ticket to the conference also entitles you to attend the following RIBA International Week events:

• International Prize Launch drinks reception on Tuesday 4 July from 19:00

Please indicate if you would like to attend when purchasing your ticket.

FAQs

Please remember to bring your printed ticket to the event. For cancellations (only available up to 7 days before the event), name changes or any other queries please email conferences@riba.org

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Royal Institute of British Architects

66 Portland Place

London

W1B 1AD

United Kingdom

View Map

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