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Coping with hate speech, fake news and online violent extremism.

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The Law Faculty

Oxford University

St Cross Building, St Cross Road

Oxford

OX1 3UL

United Kingdom

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A global onslaught on existing speech norms and institutions: coping with hate speech, fake news and online violent extremism.

A one-day conference at the PCMLP, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Price Moot Court

0930 to 1000

Arrival and coffee

1000 to 1015

Introduction and welcome: Monroe Price (Annenberg School of Communication, University of Pennsylvania)

1015 to 1130

Session 1: National and international legal standards, technology and social contexts

What was long a matter of spirited but largely episodic debate—how to isolate, identify and fashion societal responses to the certain categories of speech—has now expanded into a complex and immediate problem of large-scale institutional response. Terrorism, intense polarization, new global arrangements and the rise of fake news have all influenced national and international approaches. This session examines this process of evolution and how the interrelationship between institutions and technology affect the boundaries of hate speech differently in different states. It also begins to ask how we should manage these differences in an Internet world that facilitates instant borderless communication, but where such communication takes place in distinct social, legal and historical environments?

Chair: Monroe Price (Annenberg School of Communication, University of Pennsylvania)

Speaker 1: Jonathan Blake USA (Covington & Burling)

Speaker 2: Joan Barata Mir International law & Europe (Central European University; Centre for Internet and Human Rights,European University Viadrina)

Speaker 3: Wenlong Li China (University of Edinburgh)

Each speaker has up to 15 minutes, and then there will be at least 30 minutes of discussion, moderated by the chair.

1130 to 1200

Coffee break

1200 to 1330

Session 2: Of curating, regulation and access: Platforms and their regulators

In this highly volatile and often politicized context, what are the evolving implications for the global new media platforms and the government agencies that regulate them? The session will consider the strengths and weaknesses of the tools available, and what unwanted consequences may arise from their deployment. It examines the elusive issue of self-regulation and asks to what extent and under what circumstances platforms, and those who carry speech, should bear liability or responsibility for the material they disseminate as opposed to being seen as functionally immune conduits, and to what extent self regulation raises dangers of private censorship.

Chair: Laura Scaife (Datultacy)

Speaker 1: Rebecca MacKinnon (Ranking Digital Rights)

Speaker 2: Bernard Shen (Microsoft)

Speaker 3: Jeremy Olivier (Ofcom)

Each speaker has up to 15 minutes, and then there will be at least 45 minutes of discussion, moderated by the chair.

1330 to 1430

Lunch

1430 to 1600

Session 3: Of speakers and audiences: Their positions in national and international norms

The new environment of intensified concern with hate speech, violent extremist discourse and false news puts pressure on existing legal doctrine and international norms. How much should turn on the character of a speaker or the method used? For example, should traditional journalists, to name a category, be treated differently, for example, from citizen journalists and bloggers, to name two others. And to what extent should the different nature of the audience be considered? Should the interests of children, for example, lead to a precautionary principle, especially in dealing with certain recruitment efforts? How should institutions deal with the fact that some speech in some societies in some circumstances leads to heightened dangers?

Chair: Gill Phillips (Guardian News and Media)

Speaker 1: Dirk Voorhoof (Human Rights Centre, Ghent University; European Centre for Press and Media Freedom)

Speaker 2: Jacob Rowbottom (Oxford University)

Speaker 3 Daniel Bekele (Human Rights Watch)

Each speaker has up to 15 minutes, and then there will be at least 45 minutes of discussion, moderated by the chair.

1600 to 1615

Coffee break

1615 to 1745

Session 4: Case studies

Specific case studies will be presented, dealing with the problems of the law and regulation of hate speech, fake news and countering online violent extremism in different countries and contexts. We will draw upon the wealth of talent and experience that will be present at the Price moot competition.

Chair: Susan Benesch (Berkman Klein Centre, Harvard University)

Speaker 1: Gil Anthony Aquino The Philippines (Center for International Law, Center Law Manila)

Speaker 2: Thiago Alves Pinto Brazil (Oxford University)

Speaker 3: Chintan Chandrachaud India (Cambridge University; Quinn Emanuel)

Speaker 4: Nathaniel Bach USA (Gibson Dunn)

Each speaker has up to 10 minutes, and then there will be at least 50 minutes of discussion, moderated by the chair.

1745 to 1800

Concluding remarks Richard Danbury (Programme for Comparative Media Law and Policy; De Montfort University)

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Date and Time

Location

The Law Faculty

Oxford University

St Cross Building, St Cross Road

Oxford

OX1 3UL

United Kingdom

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