Crash course in causal graphs and causal inference

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Room 1.58, Queen's Building

University Walk

Bristol

BS8 1TR

United Kingdom

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Event description
This workshop will provide a crash-course in causal thinking and present a database of causal hypotheses

About this Event

Causal inference is a powerful way of representing hypotheses about how variables are causally related. This is becoming increasingly useful as researchers must try to integrate theories and evidence from multiple fields and multiple methods. CHIELD is a tool for coding existing theories as causal graphs and allowing researchers to locate evidence, discover links between theories and spot weak links. CHIELD focusses on theories of language evolution and language change, but the general approach could be applied to any interdisciplinary field from evolutionary biology to social policy.

The workshop will introduce the basics behind causal inference, mainly drawing on Pearl (2018) and Daniel (2017).

Topics covered:

  • Causal graphs
  • Confounding and colliders
  • Back door adjustment
  • Front door adjustment
  • Instrumental variables
  • Indicator variables
  • Model fitting with causal graphs in R
  • Causal discovery

If there is demand, a workshop on extended topics or a practical session on coding causal graphs may be arranged.

References

Roberts, S. (2018). CHIELD: causal hypotheses in evolutionary linguistics database. In Cuskley, C., Flaherty, M., Little, H., McCrohon, L., Ravignani, A. & Verhoef, T. (Eds.): The Evolution of Language: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference (EVOLANGXII). doi:10.12775/3991-1.099 http://evolang.org/torun/proceedings/papertemplate.html?p=7

Pearl, J. (2018) The Book of Why: The New Science of Cause and Effect. Penguin.

Daniel, R. (2017) Introduction to causal inference. UK Causal Inference Meeting 2017.

Rohrer, J. M. (2018). Thinking clearly about correlations and causation: Graphical causal models for observational data. Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science, 1(1), 27-42.

Woodward, J. (2008). Mental causation and neural mechanisms. Being reduced, 218-262. http://philsci-archive.pitt.edu/4136/

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Location

Room 1.58, Queen's Building

University Walk

Bristol

BS8 1TR

United Kingdom

View Map

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