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Creative practice and wellbeing: Unlocking potential through story

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Jubilee Room, James Graham Building

Headingley Campus

Leeds

LS6 3HF

United Kingdom

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Creative practice and wellbeing: Unlocking potential through story

Developed by Lisa Stephenson @StorymakersCo

Time: Thursday 27th June, National Writing Day. Place: Leeds Beckett University, 5-8pm Jubilee Room.

This is the second free CPD event from Story Makers, for anyone working with young people in Primary and Secondary schools, special needs or community settings. Leading practitioners and academics experts in drama pedagogy, creative writing and participatory theatre are coming together to deliver a series of practical workshops for colleagues exploring the potential of story to develop motivation, curiosity, literacy, agency, compassion and ask important questions about the nature of what it means to be human.

Workshop details:

First Story: Finding Voice through Creative Approaches

Over the last 10 years First Story has led over 300 creative writing residencies in secondary schools across the UK. Each school has been matched with a professional Writer-in-Residence and from there we follow a simple premise: write authentically and find your voice. Each residency and every student has enriched our practice and we continue to strive to unlock potential and build confidence through our work.

Our charity has now shared over 125,000 original stories from young writers across the country, often in the most disadvantaged communities and on National Writing Day (27th June) we invite you to take the leap of faith that many of our writers have done before - to pick up a pen and make your voice heard.

In this session, First Story writers will share examples of their practice, fresh approaches to support writing and their love for it. Join us to experience a practical exploration of the creative process and discover how to build confidence in your students via creative pedagogy.

The Vulture’ song by Blah Blah Blah Theatre:

In 2018 Theatre Company Blah Blah Blah will enter into an exciting new partnership with C&T. The Blahs have a 30 year track record of working with Leeds schools using participatory drama and theatre, and C&T specialise in blending drama and new technologies with and for children and young people. The two organisations will work together on The Vultures’ Song, a project that brings together a new performance inspired by the Partition of India and written by internationally acclaimed children’s theatre writer Mike Kenny, with interactive digital resources that will use the dramatic context of the play to frame classroom activities designed to enhance SMSC learning. The workshop will be practical, involving participants engaging in drama activity suitable for the classroom as well as gaining an insight into the overall project. It is suitable for teachers from key stages 2 - 4, as well as those with an interest in new Theatre in Education practice.

Stanley’s Secret by Libellule Theatre:

Stanley feels invisible, in fact for all anyone around him seems to notice he might as well be invisible. Until one day he receives a message in a silver orb, “You are not alone. Your power is a gift. We will find you and help you stay safe” But the message is not all he has received!

This is a 1 hour extract/ condensed version of a longer scheme of work initially commissioned as an intervention for year 4/5 children who were struggling in literacy particularly due to their low attainment in speaking and listening. The children who attended the project had a wide range of needs which impacted on their ability and willingness to contribute and communicate with others. The project was extremely successful with a huge change seen in participants both within the project sessions, back in their own classrooms and within their writing.

Using interactive storytelling and drama techniques as well as puppetry and visual art activities this carefully structured scheme provides multiple and gently increasing ways for reluctant children to communicate and become a part of an imaginative story world.

Tarzane by Interplay Theatre

Tarzanne tells the story of a young girl lost to the jungle as a toddler, growing up with an adoptive family of apes. A hidden heiress to a vast fortune, she is captured and sold back to her wealthy family. Will they be able to civilise this feral child?

Discover Tarzanne’s journey from the lush forests that raised her to the concrete jungle of the civilised world. Feel the rain drops flow from the trees, hear the melody of the bird song and the scents of the flora as you’re engrossed in a tale of two contrasting societies.

Interplay, the National Centre for Sensory Theatre, have worked for over 45 years to create a special kind of theatre that engages the senses, bringing interactive storytelling within immersive environment

Stories from the Forests of Leeds by Daniel Ingram-Brown:

Author and theatre maker Daniel Ingram-Brown has been working with local writers, school children and students to imagine Leeds as a forest – a complex, diverse place, with no wide landscape, where roads thread between buildings, connecting people and communities. Together, the project’s participants have developed a treasury of characters and stories from the Forests of Leeds, an alternative vision of the city, populated by the weird and wonderful fairy tale characters who live on its fringes. The stories are beautifully illustrated by Simon Smith, who has been out and about, visiting the towns and villages connected to the tales. Sketching what he finds, he has developed a series of illustrations that base the vision of the Forests of Leeds on the real life of the city. This is a world inhabited by the Witch of Woodhouse, Guiseley the mask maker and the three-headed giant of Headingley. And there are always more secrets waiting to be discovered…

Why a forest? In stories, the forest is a place of transformation. It's a place where people venture, away from the established order, to confront the problems that face them. Solutions and new beginnings emerge from the forest. It's where people find or lose each other, where disguises are worn and thrown off, where beasts and temptations are encountered, where those fleeing unjust laws find refuge, and where the social order is challenged or turned on its head.

Alive and Kicking Theatre:

You might find yourselves sitting in the chair that a person of royalty has just been thrown out of. You might find yourselves saving the world from The Worzlum or meeting someone at a crossroads in their life.

There’s always a chance for you to decide if you want to be rich or poor in the drama we build together or to see if you have the courage to take yourselves across the stone bridge as you set foot on your quest.

You might solve the mystery of the hammer buried in the top of a clock where the hands are set just before midnight, or you might be facing the miners, loggers and ranchers who want to take over your part of the rain forest.

Whatever drama you find yourselves in, have no doubt that you will be the heroines and heroes. You will be invited to explore the Alive And Kicking approach in which we draw on the work of Dorothy Heathcote and Sue Jennings – an approach that we have refined and extended to the point where we are able to work creatively with every child and every teacher in a school and beyond that into family life.

Drama for Writing: Developing Curious Learners by Andrew Wilkinson, Lisa Stephenson, Dr Tom Dobson:

This practical workshop explores the research findings from a collaborative project between Leeds Beckett University and Burley Woodhead Primary School. As a result of a narrow national curriculum for English, the teaching of writing in primary schools has become technical and prescriptive, with many children having little or no motivation to write. Sponsored by the UKLA, this two-term project sought to develop pupils’ motivation to write across the curriculum through enhancing Key Stage 2 teachers’ competence and confidence in using drama. The workshop explores just how powerful drama can be in making writing more natural and more meaningful for children.

Imaginary Communities: positioning teachers & children as equal play-makers by Vicky Storey & Lauren Ash

Imaginary Communities (IC) is an immersive dramatic experience, delivered in schools, invented and developed by Chol Theatre. The creative work begins with a fictional setting completely inspired by the children and teachers’ imaginations. The world is brought to life when each member of the imaginary community creates their own character. The children and teacher then continue to direct and explore their unique adventure through drama, play, creative writing and storytelling. This exciting new model of drama education radically positions children & their teachers as equal playmakers.

This workshop explores how collective story-making and drama can enable children and teachers to discover their own adventures in writing in KS2 & KS3. We invite you to join us in this practical workshop to get a flavour of your very own Imaginary Community as we guide you through the first few stages of creating your own unique world. We know you will leave feeling enthused by the possibilities this model of drama education has to offer.​

Plus further workshop from Tribe Arts

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Location

Jubilee Room, James Graham Building

Headingley Campus

Leeds

LS6 3HF

United Kingdom

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