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Culture and Communication priming projects in HRC

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The Treehouse

Berrick Saul Building

University of York

York

YO10 5DD

United Kingdom

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Culture and Communication priming talks 2017

Chair: Dr Mark Jenner, Research Theme Champion

Wine and nibbles will be served

Tara Alberts (History)
Translating Medicine in the Pre-ModernWorld c. 1350-1800
The Translating Medicine International Network brought together scholars with specialisms in the histories of scientific and medical exchange across the world in order to look at these issues across a long historical perspective. Participants worked on a range of diverse case studies spanning the period c.1350-1800, engaging with research questions about how knowledge and material are changed and adapted as they are translated and communicated around the world. Coming together in a series of workshops they examined comparatively the variety of ways in which ideas about health, sickness, and the body travelled between cultures.

Wes Lin (Sociology)
In-Touch with Food: an inter-generational approach to the narratives of food, culture and everyday life
This project focussed on how cultural values in relation to food and familial practices have impacted on changing relations and subjectivities. The M&S archivist in Leeds has confirmed that the company would be keen to cooperate research on generational issues of food and food practices. The M&S archival data comprising advertisements, packaging and so on from the 1940s, provides a unique opportunity for the team to map how generational social changes are represented and communicated through M&S ‘food narratives’.

Aimee Little (Archaeology)
Communicating beyond the grave, revealing Irelands earliest burials
In 2001 work to construct a pipeline on the banks of the River Shannon, Co. Limerick, Ireland, revealed three prehistoric graves. At least two of the graves were found to contain cremated human remains. The site, Hermitage, has become one of the most intellectually exciting sites to be revealed in the 21st-century. The three graves excavated at Hermitage have been dated and shown to span a period of more than 1000 years, suggesting that the ‘cemetery’ was in use over an extended period. A possible funeral pyre was also identified during the commercial excavation. Project collaborators at the University of Cambridge have pioneered a technique allowing normally un-analysable strontium of the cremated bone to be analysed; preliminary results show that the individuals buried in Pit A and Pit B were from geographically different locations.

Rachel O'Neill (Sociology)
Food is a feminist issue: Media, Appetites, Politics
In 1978 Susie Orbach declared fat a feminist issue. This slim volume of writing put forward a radical new understanding of feminine embodiment and the gendered psychology of eating. Taking place almost four decades later, Rachel disseminates aspects of her one-day workshop which revisits the terrain explored by Orbach and open out new themes of analysis by examining contemporary feminist perspectives on food. Of particular concern are the ways in which food media intersect with or map onto broader cultural rationalities and political programmatics. Bringing together scholars from across a range of disciplinary locations — including sociology, psychology, media and cultural studies, geography and social policy – this event aimed to address the gendered intersections of food work and body work, corporeality and digital culture, healthism and dieting discourse, weight and stigma, hunger and austerity. Supported by the Culture and Communication research theme, this event aimed to capitalise on the University of York’s unique positioning as a leader in food scholarship and in interdisciplinary gender studies. In doing so it will draw together research and expertise from IKnowFood and the AgriFood Partnership as well as the Department of Sociology and Centre for Women’s Studies.

Michael White (History of Art)
The Elterwater Merz Barn as Museum
I have written extensively on the artist Kurt Schwitters, whose final site of work is the basis of this project. This includes two studies of the translatability of his Merz collaging and assemblage practices, and their connection to experiences of exile. I am also engaged in research on the reception of Dada after 1945, as witnessed most recently in my new edition of Hans Richter’s seminal book, Dada: Art and Anti-Art. I have also been researching the role of reconstruction, particularly artists’ working spaces, in the transmission of concepts of avant-gardism. There are connections between this research and my BA Small Grant project on ‘Photomontage, Exile and Memory: Recovering Dada after the Second World War.’

Date and Time

Location

The Treehouse

Berrick Saul Building

University of York

York

YO10 5DD

United Kingdom

View Map

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