Electrification in the automotive sector

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The Goring

Beeston Place

London

SW1W 0JW

United Kingdom

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Breakfast Meeting – 08:00am to 10:30am

Electrification in the automotive sector

How is the drive towards electric vehicles changing the automotive industry? This breakfast event will explore today’s automotive landscape and consider how manufacturers and other organisations can respond to the ever-increasing demand for electric vehicles.

While some consumers have embraced electrification, this change is currently being driven principally by government in search of more sustainable transport and in particular lower levels of greenhouse gas emissions.

If consumers are whole heartedly going to accept the government-sponsored move to electric vehicles, the automotive industry faces a number of major challenges. These include: designing lighter vehicles with more efficient powertrain; implementing more efficient energy recapture; and developing software and sensor technology that together can improve vehicle performance.

Another major challenge is that of improving batteries: specifically the ability of batteries to accept charge very quickly so that they can be fully recharged in a handful of minutes; and the ability of batteries to power cars at speed for hundreds of miles between charges.

The totality of change in all these areas together is not so much evolutionary as revolutionary. The potential rewards are high. But so are the risks and the development effort required.

One critical shift we will consider is the weight of importance attached to in-car software compared against mechanical design.

In a pre-digital age a new mechanical carburettor could be designed but retro-fitting it to cars already in use would have been prohibitively expensive. With new models of electric cars, the increase in performance doesn’t always have to come from changes in mechanical design but also from the software that controls the vehicle.

This change means that it is easy to upgrade cars that are already on the road, providing them with new software that enhances their capabilities at minimal cost.

Digitalisation has other consequences. With so many sensors in cars, more and more data is being collected. This data can be used to enhance customer experience, for instance by helping owners predict and avoid problems. And it can also be used to drive new revenues as data is sold across wider transport ecosystems or used to deliver new paid-for services aimed at drivers, such as navigation, voice controls or entertainment.

All of these changes are eroding the comfortable certainties of car manufacturing. Increasingly manufacturers need to become more agile, adopting a start-up mentality, constantly innovating, accepting rapid failure as part of the price for success. Embracing digitalisation is an essential part of this process.

During the meeting we will focus on strategic questions such as:

  • Can an electric vehicle truly satisfy all customer requirements? What needs to change both in car technology and road infrastructure if consumers are to be happy with electric vehicles? How can digitalisation help with this?
  • How are changes in customer behaviour such as the sharing economy, together with government initiatives to reduce pollution, driving the move to electrification? What effect will these changes have on the design of electric vehicles?
  • How will changes in manufacturing, mechanical engineering and materials science change the way that electric and hybrid cars are developed?
  • How will testing and compliance requirements change as new electrification technologies become the norm? In particular how will software upgrades be tested prior to being offered to consumers and do digital twins have a part to play here?
  • What environmental and safety problems do electric cars have that cars running on fossil fuels don’t - for instance the need to recycle batteries and the need to guard against excessive battery heat? How can these problems be managed?
  • How will the gap between theoretical performance of electric cars and current driver behaviour be met? Will drivers need to be retrained to drive more economically (more slowly and smoothly)?
  • With data increasingly being captured as cars are driven, how can data be used to increase the efficiency of electric vehicles?
  • How will cars keep up with constantly evolving mechanical technology? For example will cars be able to change easily to new types of battery?
  • How will software updates increase the performance of electric cars? How will software upgrades be handled to ensure continued functionality and safety after software upgrades? And how can software upgrades be monetised?

Who is invited?

This briefing is for anyone investigating the way that the drive to electrification is changing the automotive industry. Delegates will be senior managers (CIO, CTO, COO, CEO and their direct reports) at organisations across the automotive sector: manufacturers and assemblers, parts manufacturers, automotive and engineering consultancies, design companies, software companies.

Registered attendees include:

Company Architect - Riversimple Movement Ltd
Engineering Director - Revolve Technologies Ltd
Technical Director - PDD Group Ltd
Connected Car Manager - McLaren Automotive
Corporate Communications Director - BMW Group UK
Head of Technology & Innovation - Gordon Murray Design
UK Head of Automotive - KPMG LLP
Head of Insights - Pod Point
Head of Vehicle & Powertrain Engineering - Tata Motors European Technical Centre
COO - RICARDO PLC
Head of Electrification and Propulsion Strategy - AMRC with Boeing
Managing Director - eDrive Engineering Services
Engg Director - JCB Excavators
Head of Automotive Electrification - McLaren Applied Technologies
Marketing Strategy Director - Volvo Cars UK Ltd
Managing Director - Mercedes-Benz Parts Logistics
CEO - Advanced Propulsion Centre UK

Be one of 12 senior business professionals around the table at The Goring Hotel who will all bring their expertise to bear to analyse the present – and the future.

For any enquiries, please contact Harry on 0208 349 6500 or email harry.p@business-reporter.co.uk.

The breakfast briefing is brought to you by Siemens and is only for senior executives as mentioned above. Registrations of junior professionals, consultants, solution providers or other sellers to this market won’t be accepted. In addition, to be eligible for this event you must be employed by a corporate legal entity such as a private or public company: if you are a sole trader or in a partnership other than a legally incorporated partnership we will be unable to offer you a place.

This breakfast briefing is free of charge to attend. However, if you cancel your attendance less than two weeks prior to the briefing, you will have to provide a replacement of equal seniority otherwise you will be a subject of £150 cancellation fee. Please also note that when you register we will ask you for your corporate email address which we will share only with the event sponsor(s). See our privacy policy.

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The Goring

Beeston Place

London

SW1W 0JW

United Kingdom

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