Free

Every Picture Tells A Story - An Exhibition of Unique Art by Ant & Jenny

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Kerseys Solicitors

32 Lloyds Avenue

Ipswich

IP1 3HD

United Kingdom

View Map

Event description

Description

‘Every Picture Tells a Story will be held at Kerseys Solicitors, Lloyds Avenue, Ipswich, and will run for six months from Thursday, 15th February, 2018. Private View from 17.30 to 20.30, Thursday 15th February, by email invitation and with Free Eventbrite tickets. The exhibition will thereafter be open to the public during regular business hours, 09.00 to 17.15, Monday to Friday, just ask at our Reception'.

This is an exciting exhibition featuring a fusion of twenty unique works by artists Ant Wooding and Jenny George. The works on display all explore the use of colour and texture, and invite us to reflect on our responses to the subjects portrayed. Each of these two local artists seek, through their work, to create not just a piece of art to perhaps adorn a wall, but also to establish a deeper element of expression, evoking a resonance and perhaps a degree of empathy, between the realms created on canvas and paper, and the world here and now; and to convey a story behind what is seen, that you as the viewer, may be able to relate to. Within the paint and the ink, within each brush stroke and line, there is the intertwined story of history, of family, of local and distant cultures, of existence, and of nature.

Ant Wooding represents local history and explores the topics of duty, service and reflection, in his portraiture work of Ipswich mayor, Hamil Clarke, which arose from discussion with the latter on the subject of art. He also explores the family unit, and its fundamental place in history… really, the family unit, in whatever context, and the stories surrounding that unit, is what makes history. Within his study of Lame Deer, which emerged from the examination of that man’s writings, he contemplates the story of the Native American philosophy, culture, and their plight. Ant’s Chinese-style ink paintings, were inspired by his long-time interest in Daoism, and a recent trip to China, where he had the privilege of receiving instruction from Winnie Sui Davies, an artist trained in the traditional Chinese style. These works, which have an iridescent quality to them due to the Mulberry Bark paper he works on, are a contemplation of the mystery of the spirit of nature. Ant further explores our connection with nature, as well as the use of colour, in his paintings ‘Lavender Bee’, ‘River Flag’, ‘Cosmic Sky’ and ‘Cosmic Dune’. What emotion, what feeling, do these works evoke? Joyfulness… calmness… serenity. In contrast, ‘Arriving in Lesbos’ and ‘Battle for Legal Aid’, both give a view into the lives of people for whom life has dealt injustices, and the life of those who fight to bring it back. Do these images conjure anger… sadness… disillusionment? These are perhaps darker subjects, but nevertheless they are part of the human story.

Jenny George uses a heavy impasto style to create her oil paintings, which are mostly related to architecture and our place in history, and usually with an element of storytelling, to form a connection between the past and present. ‘His Beloved Orwell’ is dedicated to the author Eric Arthur Blair, better known by his pen name, George Orwell — a pen name which was inspired by Blair’s love of that river. Jenny has painted the Orwell Bridge in ‘relief’, as it would not have been present during the author’s lifetime (1903 - 1950). In ‘No. 4 College Street’, Jenny reflects on where we have been, and what we have become, noting that modern life, compared to that of the past, has not changed all that much. Perhaps we have more conveniences, and the facade of life has altered… but our basic stories have remained the same. She asks, through her work, for the viewer to consider how life as we know it will one day become the past to others… how is it that we, as individuals, and as a multifaceted, multicultural society, want to be remembered? In ‘The Arboretum’, she has contemplated the human presence in the midst of nature, and how we can live in harmony with it; whilst ‘Meet us at Georgie Porgie’s’ is a cheeky nod toward one fabulous, albeit somewhat neglected, example of Ipswich’s fine architecture, and the potential she sees therein. Her collection of ink drawings inspired by Suffolk Villages, seeks to illustrate parts of our unique past, with an aim to somehow preserve what we have left. Jenny contemplates nature’s beauty and fragility with her acrylic works, ‘Faces’, ‘Cottage Garden’, ‘Niobi’ and ‘Arctic Beauty’; and its strength and endurance in ‘The Guardian’.

Also on display, there will be a collection of ink drawings, inspired by Suffolk villages, by Jenny George. Jenny often creates ink drawings prior to beginning a painting, and with this series of drawings, Jenny hopes to further illustrate and preserve pieces of architecture from our unique and colourful rural past. The collection is not yet complete and will be added to as and when Jenny completes new drawings. Ant Wooding has included his personal sketchbooks, not for sale, but for the perusal of anyone who may wish to have further insight into Ant’s creative process.


Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

Kerseys Solicitors

32 Lloyds Avenue

Ipswich

IP1 3HD

United Kingdom

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved