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Everything in Everything: Anaxagoras's Metaphysics

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Radcliffe Humanities

Woodstock Road

Oxford

OX2 6GG

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Everything in Everything interprets the key principles of Anaxagoras's philosophy, arguing for its soundness and for the explanatory value of Anaxagoras's innovative ideas in relation to the questions he had set out to address. The book places Anaxagoras's view in dialogue with current concerns in metaphysics, regarding the question of whether reality is atomless or not, displaying relevance to ancient philosophy scholars and contemporary philosophers alike.

Author Anna Marmodoro (Philosophy, University of Oxford) will discuss the book and its themes with:

Simona Aimar (Philosophy, UCL)

Naoya Iwata (Philosophy, Cambridge University)

This event will be chaired by Neil McLynn (Classics, University of Oxford)

Free and all welcome. Lunch will be available from 12.30, with discussion from 13.00-14.00.

Please register to book your seat.


Speakers:

Professor Anna Marmodoro

Anna is Official Fellow in Philosophy at Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford. She was previously a Junior Research Fellow in College, and contemporaneously held a British Academy Post-Doctoral Fellowship in the Faculty of Philosophy; and before that, she and was a Departmental Lecturer in Philosophy.

Anna specializes in two research areas: metaphysics on the one hand, and ancient, late antiquity and medieval philosophy on the other. She has also strong research interest in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of religion. In metaphysics she is particularly interested in questions concerning fundamentality; composition and structure; the nature of properties, dispositions, relations; the metaphysics of substance; and causation. With her other hat on, she has worked on an eclectic collection of topics, in Anaxagoras, Aristotle, the Stoics, Gregory of Nyssa, and Thomas Aquinas. Anna currently directs a large-scale multidisciplinary research group funded by the European Research Council and the Templeton World Charity Foundation, with a combined research budget of over £2M. Her group investigates the nature of the fundamental building blocks of reality.

Dr Naoya Iwata

Naoya is an Overseas Research Fellow of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) and a Research Fellow at Clare Hall in the University of Cambridge. There he has been undertaking his research project ‘A Study on the First Principles of Sciences in Western Ancient Thought’, funded by the JSPS.

Before then Naoya worked as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Faculty of Philosophy in the University of Oxford for Professor Anna Marmodoro’s research project ‘Power Structuralism in Ancient Ontologies’. He obtained his PhD from the Faculty of Classics in the University of Cambridge in July 2015.

Naoya specialises in ancient Greek philosophy, especially Plato and Aristotle. His current project is investigating their philosophical methods in relation to the ancient Greek geometrical method of analysis. He is more broadly interested in the research question of what they thought about the epistemic structure of each science and the relationship between different scientific disciplines.

Dr Simona Aimar

Simona is Lecturer in Philosophy at UCL, having joined the UCL philosophy department in 2015 after studying for a PhD at Oxford University. She was previously a Visiting Assistant Professor at Columbia University (Barnard).

Simona worka in ancient and contemporary metaphysics, with strong interests in philosophy of language and philosophy of mind. She is currently thinking about Aristotle's Posterior Analytics, what ordinary language teaches us about our ordinary concepts of causation, the connections between causation and modality, and what kind of properties dispositions are.

Dr Neil McLynn

Neil is Associate Professor in Later Roman History and Fellow in Classics, University of Oxford.

He studied classics and did his doctorate at Oxford, before moving to Japan in 1990. Until 2007 he taught in the Faculty of Law at Keio University, where he gave courses on a variety of subjects ranging from Shakespeare to International Relations. The experience has left him with a weakness for Japanese history in particular and for other people's subjects in general. To maintain his Japanese ties he runs a summer school for Keio students in Oxford, a project which involves a small team of Corpus undergraduates. During term he is much involved in the Oxford Centre for Late Antiquity, which organizes and hosts a busy round of research seminars.

Neil’s research interests revolve mostly around the intricacies of religious politics in Late Antiquity. He is currently writing a book on the career of Gregory Nazianzen, a fourth-century churchman whose writings illuminate the workings of politics (secular, ecclesiastical and cultural) both in the small provincial town of Nazianzus and in the imperial capital of Constantinople.

This event is part of Book at Lunchtime, a fortnightly series of bite size book discussions, with commentators from a range of disciplines.

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Location

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Radcliffe Humanities

Woodstock Road

Oxford

OX2 6GG

United Kingdom

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