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Human Rights Lab Hackathon

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Location

Oxford Brookes University JHB305

Headington Hill

Headington

OX3 0BT

United Kingdom

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Event description
Can you come up with a business innovation that would improve the lives of refugee and migrant workers across the globe?

About this Event

Can you come up with a business innovation that would improve the lives of refugee and migrant workers across the globe, addressing one of the three thematic areas?

The OxHRF Human Rights Lab challenges participants to place human rights at the forefront of innovation and entrepreneurial thinking.

Participants will have one week to formulate, plan and pitch a tech-based innovation to a contemporary human rights issues, with the mission of placing resilience at the forefront of the product.

Participants with different interests, backgrounds, skill sets and creative abilities will form multidisciplinary teams and be tasked with coming up with unique business proposals surrounding human rights and resilience.

The event will kick off at lunchtime on Monday 16th March 2020, with a series of lunchtime lectures surrounding entrepreneurial skills, humanitarian tech and business planning, and the final pitching competition taking place on Monday 23rd March 2020, to a panel of judges from public, private and academic backgrounds.

The three thematic areas for the Human Rights Business Lab are:Justice and EqualityAccess to InformationFreedom of Expression

Workshop dates and rooms

Monday 16 th March 2020 Lunchtime Kick-Off Event Time: 12.30pm - 2.00pm Room JHB305

Tuesday 17 th March 2020 Business Planning 101 Time: 12.30pm - 2.00pm Room JHB302

Thursday 19 th March 2020 Tech for Good Workshop Time: 12.30pm - 2.00pm Room CLC.G.27

Friday 20 th March 2020 Pitching Masterclass Time: 12.30pm - 2.00pm Room JHB403

Monday 23 rd March 2020 Lunchtime Pitch-Off Event. Time: 3.30pm - 5pm Room CLC.1.12

Contact gwhiteman@brookes.ac.uk

Problem statement

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights, as Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights begins. However, across the globe, we too often see dignity not being acknowledged or respected, and individual’s human’s rights not being promoted or enforced. This is most evident in the situation facing millions of refugee and migrant workers around the world. Migrant workers produce the goods and deliver the services that the global economy depends upon. Despite their key role in modern business, refugee and migrant workers are amongst the most vulnerable to exploitation. In many workplaces, working conditions and payments fall far below international standards, with living accommodations subpar and discrimination and other human rights abuses widespread. A lack of access to support from governments and trade unions further compromises refugee and migrant workers ability to assert their rights.

Can you come up with a business innovation that would improve the lives of refugee and migrant workers across the globe, addressing one of the three thematic areas?

Why Resilience?

NOUN: the capacity to recover from difficulties

There has been growing interest in resilience in the academic, humanitarian and environmental sectors. Looking through a resilience lens presents us with an opportunity to observe, measure and assess the ability of individuals and communities to mobilise their own recovery from an exposure to physical or mental setbacks. Resilience is about what action an individual or community is able to take during and after a disaster. In addition, it also asks us to consider the notion of being prepared for setbacks which involves us taking time to understand potential disruptions and then carefully maps out how to manage these - many organisations call this 'preparedness' and it can be a helpful tool that we can use in our everyday lives. It is important to remember that resilience is not all about individuals and communities; it is also about the planning and actions that organisations and governments can take to support individuals and communities to be resilient.

The world is going through extraordinary changes. From mass migrations of people, civil society uprisings, environmental changes to the rising mental health challenges of individuals – setbacks and disasters are affecting all of us.

According to UNHCR there are 70.9 million people worldwide that have been forcibly displaced - the numbers account for 43.1 million being internally displaced, 25.9 million refugees (half under the age of 18 years old) and 3.5 million asylum seekers. All these statistics reflect some of the mental and physical stresses that individuals are facing in the world today but they also lead us to question the structures and policies of organisations, companies, NGOs and governments on their role in the challenges and obstructions that individuals and communities are having to grapple with on a daily basis and in disaster and conflict scenarios.

What is the intent behind this hackathon?

Whilst many hackathons focus on tech and computer programming, the Human Rights Lab focuses on bringing together individuals with various skill sets (i.e. activists, business scholars, tech enthusiasts and lawyers) to work together to come up with innovative ideas to develop resilience in human rights.

Do I need any experience?

Just sign-up, go through the pre-hackathon preparation guide, show up and take part!

I don’t know anything about human rights, can I still take part?

Absolutely, this event includes a pre-hackathon preparation guide that will debrief you on what you need to know, a plethora of online resources and daily talks and workshops to get you up to date on all things resilience, human rights and business.

I don’t have a team, can I still join in?

Absolutely, we will put the teams together ourselves to ensure they are as multidisciplinary and diverse as possible.

Any further questions?

Contact gwhiteman@brookes.ac.uk

FAQs

Is there disabled access? Yes

What are my transport/parking options getting to the event? Please be aware that the University has introduced a new parking permit system, including a new visitor parking booking system. More information about the new parking policy is available here. We would recommend the use of public transport whenever possible.What can/can't I bring to the event? No food is allowed in the JHB Lecture Theatre.

Please be advised that photographs will be taken at the event for use on the OxHRF website, marketing materials, and other university publications. By entering this event, you consent to the University photographing and using your image and likeness. If you have any objection, talk to a member of the team on arrival to avoid being included in photographs taken at the event.

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Date and Time

Location

Oxford Brookes University JHB305

Headington Hill

Headington

OX3 0BT

United Kingdom

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