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Ron Cooke Hub auditorium

Ron Cooke Hub

University of York

Campus East

YO10 5GE

United Kingdom

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Speakers: Dr Chris Renwick, Department of History and Professor Alan Maynard, Department of Health Sciences

Five Giants: Then and now

75 years after publication of the Beveridge Report - can the welfare state survive?

Dr Chris Renwick, Department of History

Ignorance

In his famous report of 1942, William Beveridge urged the British government to make ignorance one of the 'five giant evils' to be slain after the war. By 1945, there was a commitment to raising the school leaving age and establishing a new educational system - one with grammar schools as the proposed escalator system for young and able people. The role of education in achieving Beveridge's ambitions was always complex, though. Indeed, the wartime Conservative Chancellor of the Exchequer, Kingsley Wood, said he'd rather "give money for education than throw it down the sink" with Beveridge's report. In this sense, and as I'll argue in this talk, the great achievement of keeping young people in education, employment, or training between the ages of 16 and 18 and university enrolment at levels unimaginable 75 years ago is not necessarily evidence we have done what Beveridge suggested we should. Beveridge's vision of a 'comprehensive policy of social progress' involved tackling what we know about each other, as much as what we know about the world around us. On this issue, as recent reforms to the welfare state have shown, we still have much to do.

Speaker biography: Chris Renwick is senior lecturer in modern history at the University of York. He is the author of Bread for All: The Origins of the Welfare State, which was published by Allen Lane in September 2017

Professor Alan Maynard, Department of Health Sciences

Disease

Beveridge believed in ‘a national health service for prevention and comprehensive treatment available to all members of the community’ and ‘without a charge at any point’. Implementation of this fell to Labour, and it caused perhaps more controversy than any other aspect of the post war Welfare State reforms. The NHS was the first Western health system to offer free medical care to the whole population, based not on an insurance principle but on national service provision and universal entitlement. In this lecture, Professor Maynard will explore how the ideals were implemented and how values, challenges and systems have changed (or not changed) over time.

Speaker biography: Alan Maynard is Emeritus Professor of Economics in the Department of Health Sciences, University of York. Since his appointment as Founding Director of the University of York’s Centre for Health Economics (CHE) in 1983, Alan has been a leading figure in health economics, in the UK and worldwide. He has worked as a consultant for the World Bank, the World Health Organisation, the European Union and the Department for International Development in countries such as Chile, China, South Africa and Cyprus. He has published widely in journals and books. In addition to his academic roles, Alan was Chairman of York Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (1997-2010) and Chairman, Vale of York NHS Commissioning Group (2012- 2015).

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Ron Cooke Hub auditorium

Ron Cooke Hub

University of York

Campus East

YO10 5GE

United Kingdom

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