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Images in books in the 16th century

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ENSSIB, Bibliothèque municipale de Lyon, Musée de l'imprimerie

VILLEURBANNE et LYON

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Summer School Biblissima 2018

Lyon

2-5 JULY 2018


Images in books in the 16th century


for a detailed presentation clik here

The funded project Illustrated Printed Books in Lyon (1480-1600) is organising a summer school on the images in books in the 16th century, with a special focus on how to understand, describe and use them for a various range of research topics.

The summer school is taught by Professor Richard Cooper, Brasenose College, Oxford ; Dr Paul Taylor, the Warburg Institute ; Dr Barbara Tramelli, CNRS/Equipex Biblissima.

Professor Richard Cooper (Brasenose College) is emeritus professor of French, University of Oxford. His research interests are French Renaissance literature, relations between France and Italy in the Renaissance, Court Festivals, Renaissance antiquarians; Renaissance manuscript painting. He has published extensively on the history of literature and history of the book in France, with a special focus on Lyon.

Dr Paul Taylor is Curator of the Photographic Collection at the Warburg Institute, University of London. His research has mostly been about how words affect the way we look at images. He has written about the terminology of painting in Dutch, French, English and Italian artistic texts from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries. The Photographic Collection of the Warburg Institute is the world’s largest database of subject-matter in Renaissance imagery, and Dr Taylor has many years of experience of teaching in the field.

Dr Barbara Tramelli recently published her book on the Milanese painter Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo (Brill 2017). Her research focuses on the written transmission of artistic knowledge in the Renaissance, on the relationship between text and images and on early modern workshop practices (including alchemy) in the visual and decorative arts. From 2016 she has been working as chargée de mission for the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, on the project ‘Le Livre Illustré à Lyon, 1480-1600’, funded by the Equipex Biblissima, in cooperation with the University of Oxford and the Warburg Institute in London.

THE COURSE

Professor Richard Cooper

History of the book and its illustration

in Lyon in the 16th century

The introduction to the course will consist of an overview of printing in Lyon up to outbreak of the Wars of Religion (1562). Printing reaches Lyon in 1472/73, when the first merchant booksellers like the Lyonnais Barthélemy Buyer start publishing, entrusting the production of their books to printers like the Belgian Guillaume Leroy. Lyon quickly specialises in illustrated books, printing the first illustrated book in French, followed soon after by the magnificent edition of Terence by the Trechsels (1493). At the turn of the century, Lyon is producing a third of all books printed in France and, with Paris, will dominate the book trade in France for the sixteenth century. Thanks to its strategic position close to the Italian and Swiss borders, and the availability of finance from bankers and merchants, Lyon attracts printers from abroad, who set up distribution networks throughout Europe, including Germany and Spain.

The period 1530-60 is the heyday of Lyonnais printing is. For thirty years, the German printer Sébastien Gryphe publishes classical texts and the latest humanist works in editions widely distributed, almost exclusively in Latin and Greek. By contrast a printer like François Juste publishes mainly vernacular works, including new writing by Rabelais or Marot, In the 1540s, the two rival houses of Jean de Tournes (a printer) and Guillaume Roville (a publisher), greatly diversify their production, focusing on Italian works, new poetry, and emblem books, many of them richly illustrated. Jacques Moderne also opens up a new market in Lyon in the printing of music.

Many of the printers and their employees are protestants, and the outbreak of the Wars of Religion, with the sack of the city in 1562, led to a many printers choosing exile, and printing entering a decline from which Lyon took time to recover.

We will look at case studies of some major Lyonnais printers, the range of subjects they published, and the role of illustration in their books.

Dr Paul Taylor

Book illustrations, title pages and bookbindings

Dr Taylor’s course aim is to introduce the subject matter of Lyon book illustrations before 1600. Most of the images in books of the period assume knowledge of a religious, literary and philosophical context which is no longer familiar, and if we are to understand what illustrations depict we need to engage in a form of cultural archaeology, which will allow us to reconstruct the references and allusions of the imagery of the time.

There are many thousands of different subjects in sixteenth-century imagery, and it will only be possible in this brief course to introduce the main types of image, and to give some idea of how they functioned in European culture. The course will consist of six 90-minute classes taught over three days, devoted to 1) biblical illustration and typology, 2) antiquities, mythology and literature, 3) personifications, emblems and devices, 4) portraits and pageants, 5) divination and astrology, and 6) alchemy, medicine and geography.

Dr Barbara Tramelli

Dr Barbara Tramelli will teach three course over three days, at Enssib at well as at the Public library in Lyon and the Museum of Printing.

Between text and Image: the collection of illustrated books at the municipal library of Lyon (1480-1600)

The printing industry in Lyon during the Renaissance is characterized by the importance given to illustration. The number of books printed in the city during the sixteenth century is around 25,000, of which we estimate that at least 2,000 are illustrated. The Bibliothèque Municipale (Public Library) in Lyon hosts the largest collections of early printed books in France outside Paris, and for the first lesson I will select and present (subject to curators’ approval) some of the highlights of the collection, among which the Mirouer de la Redemption de l’Humaine Lignage, the first illustrated book printed in France, in order to give an overview on the developments and growing popularity of illustrated books in the city. I will make comparisons between editions and between images, to see how the same iconographic subject was reinterpreted by different artists in the same period.

The printing process and the print matrices

as objects of knowledge

In recent years, art historical research increasingly shifted its focus on the role of artistic materials and tools as key-narrators of the artistic process as well as bearers of artistic value in themselves. For printed images, surviving cut woodblocks, engraved plates and other print matrices convey essential information which the final product cannot offer, concerning (but not limited to) artists and printers’ techniques and ways of working. The Musée de l’Imprimerie in Lyon holds a very large collection of print matrices, among which an exceptional collection of around 600 woodblocks with different biblical episodes engraved or drawn. In order to better understand the illustrations seen at the Bibliothèque Municipale, this class will focus on a selection of woodblocks (to be selected with the permission of the Museum’s curators) to gain insight into this crucial surviving material, in order to understand how these objects were produced, used and shared among printers in the city of Lyon in the sixteenth century.

Indexing iconographic developments

The Warburg Institute database

This class will offer a more technical approach on the digital collection ‘Le livre illustré à Lyon’ hosted by the Warburg Database. It will present an introduction on the history of the Warburg Photographic Collection, an explanation of the Iconographic types in the Database and of the ways of indexing. It will then present examples of iconographic developments, and it will end with a practical example of how to create a file in the database and how to create multiple indexations for a complex illustration.

Lessons take place at the Ecole nationale supérieure des sciences de l'information et des bibliothèques, the Municipal library in Lyon (Fonds anciens) and the Lyon Museum of printing


2 July


Richard Cooper

History of the book and its illustration in Lyon in the 16th century


3 July

Morning

Paul Taylor

Book illustrations, title pages and bookbindings (1)



Afternoon


Barbara Tramelli

Between text and Image: the collection of illustrated books at the municipal library of Lyon (1480-1600)

4 July

Morning

Paul Taylor

Book illustrations, title pages and bookbindings (2)

Afternoon


Barbara Tramelli

The printing process and the print matrices as objects of knowledge

5 July

Enssib

Morning

Paul Taylor

Book illustrations, title pages and bookbindings (3)

Afternoon

Barbara Tramelli

Indexing iconographic developments: The Warburg Institute database

There is no fee to attend the Summer school. The Centre Gabriel Naudé is offering 8 grants to attend. The grants will cover the fees for the registration as well as the meals and 4 nights in Lyon. Travel expenses are not covered.Applications close Monday 4 June. To apply follow this link.

The project is funded by Equipex biblissima; the summer course is funded by the research centre Centre Gabriel Naudé, Ecole nationale superieure des sciences de l’information et des bibliotheques (Enssib) and the Warburg Institute (University of london).

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ENSSIB, Bibliothèque municipale de Lyon, Musée de l'imprimerie

VILLEURBANNE et LYON

France

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