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Inaugural Lecture:Prof Stephanie Hemelryk- Donald

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Stephen Langton Lecture Theatre

Stephen Langton Building

Brayford Campus

Lincoln

LN6 7TS

United Kingdom

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Registration from 6.00pm, Lecture begins a 6.30 pm.

From the Long March to the Yellow Brick Road to the Big Walk

A scholarly adventure through childhood, world cinema and migrancy.

Mobility and migration underpin the great story of humanity and the stories of individual humans, their kinship groups, their societies and their cultures. Walking in West Yorkshire, I find myself at a place marked by a bench and a hamlet of ruined dwellings. The guidebook simply says that Piper Holes was inhabited until the 20th century. What happened? Where did they go? Whatever the story, it resonates with all those moments of excited or agonised decision. We have to leave now, we have to leave everything, there is no place like home here, not now, perhaps never again. People move, and of course, their children (usually) move with them. Sometimes the children move on their own. In this lecture I use examples world cinema to suggest a narrative of childhood in suspension. I draw on the insights of children who have worked alongside me in research and discuss how child migrants forge pathways for adults as settlers, as migrants and as refugees.

Stephanie Hemelryk Donald BA(Hons) Oxon, MA Soton, DPhil Suss., FASSA FRSA

Stephanie Hemelryk Donald is Distinguished Professor in the College of Arts at The University of Lincoln, and Research Director of the Centre for Culture and Creativity. She has served as Chair of the Australian Research Council (Humanities and Creative Arts College of Experts). She was also Deputy Convenor of Humanities for the Hong Kong RAE Committee in 2014. She is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Social Sciences and a Visiting professor at UNSW (Art and Design). She served as Academic Lead for the Grand Challenge on Refugees and Migrants at UNSW 2017-2018. She led continuous large grants from the Australian Research Council 2003-2018, totalling just over $2 million AUD, and has been Leverhulme Visiting International Fellow and a Network Grant CI. She has published 18 books, 46 book sections, 27 journal articles and 5 special issues since 1997, and has also contributed creative works and curatorial outputs.

Publications (selected):

Donald, S Hemelryk. There's No Place Like Home: The Migrant Child in World Cinema (London: IB Tauris, 2018). Winner CHOICE award 2018 Outstanding Academic Title.

_____. S. Wright and E. Wilson (eds). Childhood and Nation in World Cinema: borders and encounters (New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2017) (Paperback 2018).

_____. and C. Lindner (eds). Inert Cities: Globalization, Mobility and Suspension in Visual Culture (London: IB Tauris, 2014.).

_____. T. Anderson and D.Spry (eds). Youth, Society and Mobile Media in Asia, (London: Routledge, 2010).

_____. E. Kofman, and C.Kevin (eds). Branding Cities: Cosmopolitanism, Parochialism, and Social Change. (New York: Routledge Academic 2009. Paperback 2012)

_____. and J.G.Gammack. Tourism and the Branded City: Film and Identity on the Pacific Rim. (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007).

Balnaves, M. SH Donald and B. Shoesmith. Media Theories and Approaches: A Global Perspective. (London: Palgrave, 2009) (Arabic translation, University Presses, Egypt, 2010)

Donald, SH and R.J. Benewick, The State of China Atlas (1999, 2005, 2009), University of California Press, New South (UNSW), and Penguin Books.

By booking onto this event you accept that the Lincoln Institute for Advanced Studies may contact you about this, or other events. If you would rather not recieve any communications around the Inaugural Lectures, please email: lias@lincoln.ac.uk.

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Stephen Langton Lecture Theatre

Stephen Langton Building

Brayford Campus

Lincoln

LN6 7TS

United Kingdom

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