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InHabit: People, Places and Possessions

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Radcliffe Humanities

Woodstock Road

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OX2 6GG

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Central to human life and experience, habitation forms a context for enquiry within many disciplines. Co-editors Dr Antony Buxton (Continuing Education, University of Oxford), Dr Linda Hulin (Archeology, University of Oxford) and Dr Jane Anderson (Architecture, Oxford Brookes University) join this Book at Lunchtime event to discuss this collection. Bringing together perspectives on human habitation in the fields of anthropology, archaeology, social history, material culture, literature, art and design, and architecture, significant shared themes are the physical and social structuring of space, practice and agency, consumption and gender, and permanence and impermanence. Topics range from archaeological artefacts to architectural concepts, from Romano-British consumption to the 1950s Playboy apartment, from historical elite habitation to present-day homelessness, from dwelling "on the move" to the crisis of household dissolution, and from interior design to installation art. Not only is this volume a rich resource of varied aspects and contexts of habitation, it also provides compelling examples of the potential for interdisciplinary conversations around significant shared themes.

Antony, Jane and Linda are joined by:

Dr Cathy Oakes (History of Art, University of Oxford)

Dr Oliver Cox (History, University of Oxford)

This event will be chaired by Professor William Whyte (History, University of Oxford).

Lunch available from 12.30-13.00, discussion from 13.00-14.00. Free and all welcome.


Speakers:

Dr Antony Buxton

Antony Buxton has approached the study of the domestic through a working life which has included the designing, making and conservation of furniture. His doctoral research explored the domestic practice revealed through the detailed examination of the material culture listed in early modern probate inventories. He has a continuing research interest in the way that in which objects and space are employed in a domestic discourse.

Dr Linda Hulin

Linda is Research Officer at the Oxford Centre for Maritime Archaeology, a Fellow & Tutor in Archaeology and Anthropology at Harris Manchester College and Tutor in Archaeology at Magdalen College.

Linda’s interests centre upon the materiality of interregional contact across the eastern Mediterranean, and particularly the Levant, Egypt, Cyprus and Libya. She has researched the impact of empire on both rulers and ruled in the Late Bronze Age, and she focuses generally upon the relationship between aesthetic sensibilities and social identification in both the ancient and modern world. Linda directs the Western Marmarica Coastal Survey in Libya, which explores the development of settlements in relation to maritime and nomadic trade. She also co-directs, with Senta German of Montclair University, Down from the sea: mariner networks in the Late Bronze Age eastern Mediterranean, which looks at sailors’ activities on land.

Dr Cathy Oakes

Cathy is Director of Studies in the History of Art; Director of the MSt in Literature and Arts and Co-Director of programmes in Historical Studies and Architectural History.

She is a medievalist specialising in Romanesque art and architecture, and the interrelation of word and image in western medieval culture. Her career began in museum education at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London whence she moved on to academic posts first at Bristol University and then at Oxford. Here she has worked alongside colleagues in medieval studies on three conferences on medieval cloisters, medieval lady chapels, and medieval chantries.

Her publications have included work on French and English Romanesque subjects, and articles which have emerged from her research on Marian iconography. In 2008 her major monograph on Marian intercession in medieval art and devotion was published by Brepols. More recently she has turned her attention to English Early Modern material religious culture with articles on two early sixteenth-century chantries and on a series of little known didactic wall-paintings at Bristol Cathedral.

In promoting and developing the study of visual culture, Cathy has initiated programmes where artists talk about their work, and courses in which artists work with non-practitioners and demonstrate the interdependence of art practice and art history. In the local community she ran a project funded by the Arts Council exploring photography as a tool of local history and as a creative outlet for recording the present.

Dr Oliver Cox

Oliver Cox is Heritage Engagement Fellow at the University of Oxford and a historian by training. He received his undergraduate, masters and doctoral degrees from the University of Oxford and has published widely on Gothic Revival architecture, landscape gardening, patriotism, and the country house. His From Addison to Austen: A Short Guide to the Long Eighteenth Century will be published in 2017, and The British Country House Revisited in early 2018.

Oliver created the Thames Valley Country House Partnership (www.tvchp.org) in 2013 as a way of linking entrepreneurial ideas in the heritage sector with researchers in the University of Oxford. In his position as Heritage Engagement Fellow he co-ordinates a range of collaborative projects with the UK and international heritage sector, co-supervises the flagship Trusted Source Knowledge Transfer Partnership with the National Trust, and is responsible for developing long term strategic partnerships for the University of Oxford.

Professor William Whyte

William is Professor of Social and Architectural History at the University of Oxford.

He is interested in people and equally preoccupied by things and places. He is especially intrigued by what the serious investigation of the built and natural environment does to existing accounts of modern British and European history. His research has consequently often focused on architecture, and he has a special interest in institutions like schools, universities, and churches.

His first book, Oxford Jackson: architecture, education, status, and style, 1835-1924 (2006) explored the work of an influential university architect. His second, funded by a Philip Leverhulme Prize, was Redbrick: a social and architectural history of Britain's civic universities (2015; paperback 2016). His third, Unlocking the Church: the lost secrets of Victorian sacred space, grew out of the Hensley Henson Lectures in 2014 and will be published by OUP in 2017. Now, as the final part of what's become a trilogy on university architecture, he is working on The University: a material history, for Harvard University Press.

With Dr Oliver Cox, he is leading a joint AHRC/Innovate UK/National Trust Knowledge Transfer Project, providing a Trusted Source for visitors to National Trust properties. With Professor Maggie Snowling and Professor Kate Nation, he is also working on a Wellcome Trust/John Fell funded project on the history of dyslexia.

This event is part of Book at Lunchtime, a fortnightly series of bite size book discussions, with commentators from a range of disciplines.

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Radcliffe Humanities

Woodstock Road

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OX2 6GG

United Kingdom

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