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Interactive Photogrammetry workshop

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Tate Modern

Tate Exchange Blavatnik Building, Level 5

London

SE1

United Kingdom

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Photogrammetry is the science of making measurements from photographs.

It is used for mapping the exact positions of surface points – for example, in cultural heritage research and preservation/replication of major artefacts.

In this workshop, specialists Ferdinand Saumarez Smith, Otto Lowe and Arthur Prior will be presenting the work of Factum Foundation, world leading organisation on digital technology for conservation, and will discuss how they have used photogrammetry and other 3D imaging techniques to create maps of the Kuikuro indigenous territory in Xingu (Brazil) and cultural aspects of their culture such as images, sounds, graphics, artifacts and architecture. The 2,5 hour workshop will include e a practical demonstration of how to generate a 3D model.


About Factum Foundation:

The Factum Foundation for Digital Technology in Conservation is a not-for-profit world leading organisation specialised in using technology as a tool for preservation of cultural and historical patrimony, founded in 2009 in Madrid. It works alongside its sister company, Factum Arte: a multi-disciplinary workshop in Madrid dedicated to digital mediation in contemporary art and the production of facsimiles. The Foundation was established to demonstrate the importance of documenting, monitoring, studying, recreating and disseminating the world’s cultural heritage through the rigorous development of high-resolution recording and re-materialization techniques. The Foundation’s activities include building digital archives for preservation and further study, setting up training centres for locals to learn the different technologies developed by the Foundation to record their own cultural heritage, and producing exact facsimiles as part of a new approach to conservation and restoration.

About the Xingu

The Xingu is a protected area of more than 2.6 million hectares and home to 16 indigenous peoples, including the Kuikuro. The area was designated as a protected national park in 1961 to protect the lives and culture of its indigenous villages and to preserve the local environment.

In May 2017, indigenous filmmaker Takumã Kuikuro collaborated with Adam Lowe, British digital technology artist and director of Factum Foundation, and Jerry Brotton, a scholar in cartographic history at Queen Mary University of London, in his village in the Xingu region of Brazil as part of an exchange programme curated by People's Palace Projects (PPP) in partnership with AIKAX. The Xingu, Mato Grosso State, is a protected area of more than 2.6 million hectares and home to 16 indigenous peoples, including the Kuikuro. The artists and researchers worked together, using advanced digital technologies to enable the community of the Ipatse village, Takumã’s home, to create 3D maps of their territories and cultures. Takumã and Factum Foundation used a 3D Faro laser scanner to record vulnerable aspects of Kuikuro cultural heritage including images, sounds, graphics, artefacts and architecture. The project explored new ways in which indigenous peoples can bring the evolving experiences of first millennial life to contemporary debates about Brazilian economic and social development in the third millennium. The research exchange in 2017 was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, Newton Fund and Global Challenges Research Fund. PPP is core funded as a National Portfolio Organisation of Arts Council England and by QMUL. Click here for more information.


About photogrammetry:

What we use it for: The quick recording of vulnerable and inaccessible sites. Photogrammetry is the ideal way to obtain 3D information in situations where it is not possible to use 3D scanners (inaccessible locations, conflict zones), or when high-speed recording is required (scanning people, living organisms, liquids in movement). It is ideal for the recording of translucent surfaces like alabaster and marble. Due to the composite nature of the image capture, colour and form can be extracted from the data. Factum Arte has applied this technology to record the Stelae at Nahr el Kalb in Lebanon and is currently perfecting both the technique and the software in order to record the Sarcophagus of Seti I in Sir John Soane’s Museum. We have recently completed the construction of a 9 camera system capable of recording objects up to about 50 x 50 x 50 cm in about 4 seconds.

Photogrammetry has been used since the birth of modern photography in fields such as topographical mapping, architecture and archeology. Factum Arte’s work and research is focused on close range photogrammetry as a means to record the form and texture of surfaces and objects. Recent developments are based on advances in computer vision technologies and SfM (Structure from Motion) software.

The data can be recorded with commercially available cameras that capture multiple shots of the entire surface of an object. Close-range photography can result in high-resolution data. Basic processing is required in the field to ensure that no areas have been missed. Post processing is time consuming. Factum Arte’s agenda at present is to record as many sites as possible at the highest practical resolution.


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Tate Modern

Tate Exchange Blavatnik Building, Level 5

London

SE1

United Kingdom

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