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International Postgraduate Port and Maritime Studies Conference

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Location

Link Rooms 1 & 2, Arts Complex

University of Bristol

3-5 Woodland Road

Bristol

BS8 1TB

United Kingdom

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This event is supported by the Economic History Society, Society for Nautical Research, Centre for Port and Maritime History and the University of Bristol.

Registration will close on Thursday 13th April

Programme:

Thursday 20th April

08:30-09:15 - Welcome and registration

09:30-11:00 - Panel 1: Ports, Economies, and War

Chair: Jack Avery

Andre Murteria (New University of Lisbon) The Dutch-Portuguese Naval War in Asia in the First Quarter of the C17th

Benjamin Redding (University of Warwick) England, France and the Loss of Calais in January 1558: A Maritime Perspective

Tim Riding (Queen Mary, University of London) “A Jewell” or “a dunghill”? Bombay’s changing role in East India Company thought, c. 1660–1720

Sven Ristau (University of Greifswald) Analysis of Regional Economic Port Systems: An investigation of Prussian Baltic ports in the C19th

11:00-11:15 Tea and coffee

11:15-13:00 Panel 2: Wales and Southern England

Andrew Brown (University of Wales) ‘The abominable plunderer of wrecks’: The Welsh wrecker, c.1700-1830, custom and practice

Josh Ivinson (University of Cambridge) The commercialisation of distant-water fisheries in the port towns of South West England, 1560-1630

Benjamin Jennings (Swansea University) The ‘country people’ versus the state: Smuggling and resistance in South Wales 1671-1850

Maria Newberry (University of Southampton) Richard Shepard - A Southampton mariner in the 1770s

13:00-14:00 Lunch

14:00-15:00 Keynote address: Laurence Publicover (University of Bristol) Literature and the Sea

15:00-15:15 Tea and coffee

15:15-17:00 Panel 3: Maritime Culture and Intelligence

Chair: Lawrence Publicover

Jack Avery (University of Bristol) Statesman-like, I'll sawcily impose: the shipboard experience of government officials in the Restoration Navy

Claire Day (University of Hull) The suit: A cultural ritual of the deep-sea trawlermen of Hull

Amedeo Santolini (University of Bologna) Shanties and Forebitters: nautical Anglo-American repertoires from the C19th century

Chenyin Tang (University of Southampton) Western Opera in Maritime East Asia (1842-1941): Newspapers as Nodes in Transnational Networks

Friday 21 April

8:30-9:15 Tea and coffee

9:30-11:00 Panel 4: Maritime Knowledge and Technologies

Chair: David Wilson

Emily Akkermans (University of Edinburgh/National Maritime Museum) Instruments and method: navigational practices in the Arctic, 1819-1825

Alan Bollom (Bournemouth University) The armoured cruiser during the Great War

Hielke van Nieuwenhuize (University of Griefswald) The migration of Dutch naval officers to Sweden, 1600-1660

Teele Sar (Estonian Maritime Museum) Passenger steamers as tools of modernisation in the Russian Baltic provinces C19th

11:00-11:15 Tea and coffee

11:15-13:00 Panel 5: Crime and Deviancy


Joe Davey (University of Portsmouth) Sailor Criminality in a Port City – Bristol 1850-1914

Yannis Gonatidis (University of Crete) Suicides in Nineteenth-Century Port of Hermoupolis (Syros).

Siobhan Hearne (University of Nottingham) Prostituion, venereal diseases and the regulation of Baltic fleet sailors in the early 1900s

Melanie Holihead (University of Oxford) Good-looking sailors and worthless nymphs: percpetions of character and crime in a nineteenth-century port town

13:00-14:00 Lunch

14:00-15:00 Keynote address: Evan Jones (University of Bristol) TBA

15:00-15:15 Tea and coffee

15:15-17:00 Panel 6: The Carribean and South Atlantic

Chair: Siobhan Hearne

Steve Church (University of New South Wales) Omoa: Success and Failure at an eighteenth-century port and fort

Elizabeth Libero (University of Portsmouth) ‘That daring spirit of enterprise’: Economic incentives in South Atlantic naval operations 1805-1807

Giada Pizzoni (University of Warwick) British Catholic Merchants and their Global Networks from the West Indies to the Mediterranean, 1670-1714.

David Wilson (University of Strathclyde) Supressing pyrates, protecting trade: British responses to Atlantic piracy in the early eighteenth century




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Date and Time

Location

Link Rooms 1 & 2, Arts Complex

University of Bristol

3-5 Woodland Road

Bristol

BS8 1TB

United Kingdom

View Map

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