£4 – £6

Lecture: ‘An die Musik: Handel and Haydn'

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William Elder Building

56-58 Castlegate

Berwick-upon-Tweed

TD15 1JT

United Kingdom

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This lecture, by Dr. Richard Moore, forms part of a collaboration with Berwick Arts Choir, who are performing Handel’s Te Deum and Jubilate for the Peace of Utrecht and Haydn’s Paukenmesse, on Saturday April 21st at 7pm at Holy Trinity Church. If you plan to attend both lecture and concert, please click here.

The lecture will introduce the works and explore Handel’s and Haydn's creative processes set within their own historic context.

Music to welcome peace: can there be a more noble combination of cultural and social harmony? But war too has inspired great music. Handel's Te Deum is a sublime work made all the more special by the ambiguities of its composition. It was completed in January 1713 three months after Handel had returned to London. Did he compose it in response to an official invitation from the English court or speculatively in the hope that it would be taken up? Documents recently discovered actually suggest that the performance precipitated Handel’s dismissal from the Elector’s service. Fortunately this seems to have done him no professional harm when the Elector succeeded Queen Anne as George 1st in the following year.

The second piece was composed in August 1796, at the time of Austria’s general mobilisation into war. Four years into the European war following the French Revolution, Austrian troops were doing badly against the French in Italy and Germany, and Austria feared invasion. Reflecting the troubled mood of his time, Haydn integrated references to battle in the Benedictus and Agnus Dei movements. He was himself a deeply religious man, who appended the words “Praise be to God” at the end of every completed score and it is possible here that one can also sense a prayer for peace, although much of the work is of a lyrically joyful nature

Come and learn about the political, social and military background to these works and the way in which they are part of a great tradition in which music arises like a Phoenix out of pain, death and loss. In this centenary year when we commemorate the end of World War 1, let us find something of the resilience of the human spirit, seeking again the power of melody to transport the soul from the battlefields of pain to the celebration of the summits of peace.

The lecture will be accessible to all and no previous knowledge is assumed.


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Date and Time

Location

William Elder Building

56-58 Castlegate

Berwick-upon-Tweed

TD15 1JT

United Kingdom

View Map

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 7 days before event

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