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Lecture/Film 3 Visual Storytelling

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The Maltings

Eastern Lane

Berwick-upon-Tweed

TD15 1AJ

United Kingdom

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This event combines a lecture by Derek Wilson, titled Visual Storytelling followed by a showing of FW Murnau's The Last Laugh. It is part of In A New Light - see more in movies, a series of 6 lectures/screenings. You can learn more about the entire series, which costs £48, at www.anewlight.co.uk. Entry to Visual Storytelling is free to members of Berwick Film Society, who are showing Murnau's Sunrise - A Song of Two Humans on October 10th as part of their 2017/8 programme.

The lecture will survey the development of film techniques in telling stories on film, including the following key stages:

  • From 'people-watching' to watching movies

  • Making the viewer 'tell' the story, identifying

  • Mise en scene, atmosphere

  • Actors and movement

  • Editing and time

  • Editing and meaning

  • Close-ups, angles

  • Shots, cuts, camera trickery

  • Perspectives

  • Moving the camera

  • Add sound and music

We will look in particular at the techniques pioneered by FW Murnau in The Last Laugh and in Sunrise - A Song of Two Humans, which Murnau made in 1927 after he moved to Hollywood. It has consistently ranked as one of the best films ever made.

The Last Laugh was made by Murnau for UFA in Germany in 1924 and was the first major film to rely entirely on the camera to tell the story (i.e. there were no intertitles). This was achieved by making the camera mobile (called "unchained camera"), using dollies or wires for tracking shots and moving point-of-view shots. Murnau's work was a major influence on Alfred Hitchcock, who was working at UFA as an assistant director when The Last Laugh was being made. (Hitchcock's first job in the movies had been as a designer of intertitles, which Murnau and his colleagues were doing their best to eliminate!)

As well as being a pioneer in cinematic techniques, The Last Laugh was a major critical and financial success. Along with Nosferatu (1922) and Faust (1926), it cemented Murnau's reputation as the leading light of German Expressionism, and paved the way for his move to Hollywood in 1927.

Image Credit: Friedrich-Wilhelm-Murnau-Stiftung, Wiesbaden, Germany

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Date and Time

Location

The Maltings

Eastern Lane

Berwick-upon-Tweed

TD15 1AJ

United Kingdom

View Map

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 7 days before event

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