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Quarry House

Quarry Hill

LS2 7UA

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In order to help build a richer connection between the academic and policy worlds, the Leeds Social Sciences Institute (LSSI) at the University of Leeds, and the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) have developed a new seminar series: Linking Leeds.

This seminar series will provide an opportunity to hear from both leading Social Scientists at the University of Leeds as well as prominent analysts, strategists and policy makers from the Department for Work and Pensions.

At this event, we will hear from Professor Christina Beatty on 'The Uneven Impact of Welfare Reform' & Dr Ghazala Mir on 'Variations by Group - How can we reduce ethnic and religious group inequalities in the labour market?' The seminar will be followed by a 30 minute question and answer session.

If you have any access requirements or any further questions about the Linking Leeds seminar series, please contact LSSI Coordinator, Hannah Crow (H.E.Crow@leeds.ac.uk).


The uneven impact of welfare reform on places and people

Professor Christina Beatty

Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research Sheffield Hallam University

Welfare reform has been a defining feature of contemporary UK Government policy. The intention is to create a welfare system which is fit for the 21st century; however, post-2010 welfare reforms reduce entitlement and restrict eligibility across a range of working age benefits. Evidence will be presented on the uneven cumulative impact of welfare reform across the country, by household types and tenure. The extent to which areas facing the brunt of welfare reform are the same places that have experienced the destruction of industrial jobs since the 1980s will also be examined.

Variations by group - How can we reduce ethnic and religious group inequalities in the labour market?

Dr Ghazala Mir

Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds

The UK ethnic pay gap is worse that the gender pay gap and some ethnic and religious minorities are significantly overrepresented amongst those who are unemployed. Higher rates of disability and long term illness also affect many of these communities.

Public services are key employers nationally and can contribute to the labour market and social inclusion of these groups. This presentation will cover evidence from a global review of strategies aimed at increasing the representation of BME and religious minorities in public services.'

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Quarry House

Quarry Hill

LS2 7UA

United Kingdom

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