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LONDON WINTER LECTURES SEASON TICKET 2018-19

The Gardens Trust

Friday, 7 December 2018 at 18:30 - Wednesday, 10 April 2019 at 20:00 (GMT)

LONDON WINTER LECTURES SEASON TICKET 2018-19

Ticket Information

Ticket Type Sales End Price Fee Quantity
Gardens Trust and County Gardens Trust members 31 Jan 2019 £45.00 £0.00
Non-member's season ticket 31 Jan 2019 £75.00 £0.00

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Event Details

BOOK A SEASON TICKET AT REDUCED RATE FOR THE FULL SERIES OF SIX LECTURES, STARTING ON FRIDAY 7 DECEMBER 2018 WITH DR DAVID JACQUES ON 'THE ELIZABETHAN GARDEN REIMAGINED AND REINVENTED'

 

Friday 7 December
The Elizabethan garden reimagined and reinvented
Dr David Jacques, Garden Historian and Conservationist

We don’t really know what Elizabethan gardens were like; we have almost no images, and poets were general and metaphorical. That, however, has not stopped historians, architects and even garden historians imagining their design, decoration and detail. The very absence of hard fact has permitted unbridled speculation. Hence this talk is not about actual Elizabethan gardens, for there is little to say with confidence, but about how romantic-minded writers have repeatedly reinvented the idea of them to accord with their personal predilections concerning the customs, manners, moods and delights of the time.

Wednesday 30 January
The Elizabethan Garden at Kenilworth: History and Restoration
Dr Anna Keay, formerly Curatorial Director at English Heritage, now Director of the Landmark Trust

Anna will discuss the remarkable garden created at Kenilworth Castle in the 1570s by Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester. Perhaps the best recorded Elizabethan privy garden, it was at the heart of Elizabeth I’s long visit to the castle in 1575, and the subject of an ambitious restoration by English Heritage in 2009. The talk will discuss the garden and its significance, the research and investigation process that informed the restoration project and the challenges and issues which were tackled in realising the re-created garden. Anna jointly edited The Elizabethan Garden at Kenilworth with John Watkins, published by English Heritage in 2013.

Wednesday 20 February
Oxford Botanic Garden: Past, Present and Future
Professor Simon Hiscock, Director of the Oxford Botanic Garden & Arboretum

Oxford Botanic Garden, founded in 1621, is the oldest botanic garden in the UK. In this talk Simon will reflect upon the Garden’s history, its current status and challenges, and our ambitious plans for the future as we approach the Garden’s 400th anniversary.

Wednesday 6 March
Nicholas Hawksmoor’s designs for the Gardens of Castle Howard
Dr Sally Jeffery, Architectural and Garden Historian

Among documents formerly at Wilton House are four sketches for streams and rockwork attributed to Nicholas Hawksmoor which have recently been identified as projects for the garden in Wray Wood, Castle Howard. This naturalistic woodland garden was much admired by early visitors, who commented on its innovative features, including a cave, an artificial stream with cascades and rockwork, and much classical sculpture inspired by Ovid. Little now survives, but using these drawings and other records, a picture of the garden can be constructed, and Hawksmoor’s role in the design can be better appreciated.

Wednesday 27 March
John Brookes: his landscape legacy
Dr Barbara Simms, Institute of Historical Research, University of London

John Brookes is most often associated with the ‘room outside’, the subject of his seminal book of 1969 inspired by his early work in small London gardens. This talk will demonstrate how over the subsequent fifty years he remained at the forefront of design by creating distinctive gardens and landscapes increasingly based on ecological principles and designing in harmony with nature and the local vernacular - without losing sight of his belief that a garden is a place for use by people.

Wednesday 10 April
Studying Orchards in Eastern England
Professor Tom Williamson, University of East Anglia

Orchards have formed an important part of our culture for centuries, but investigations of their history are hampered by persistent myths concerning the age of particular examples, and about the antiquity of the fruit varieties they contain. These issues are currently being addressed by a research project based at the University of East Anglia in Norwich. This talk will discuss the history of different kinds of orchard – farmhouse, institutional, commercial, and those which, in various periods, have formed elements in designed landscapes. It will also explore a range of related issues, including the age and origins of ‘traditional’ fruit varieties.

Do you have questions about LONDON WINTER LECTURES SEASON TICKET 2018-19? Contact The Gardens Trust

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When & Where


The Gallery
77 Cowcross Street
EC1M 6EL
United Kingdom

Friday, 7 December 2018 at 18:30 - Wednesday, 10 April 2019 at 20:00 (GMT)


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The Gardens Trust

The Gardens Trust was formed by the merger of the Association of Gardens Trusts (AGT) and the Garden History Society (GHS) on Friday 24th July 2015.

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