Free

Lunchtime Lectures

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Bristol Central Library

Bristol

BS1

United Kingdom

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THIS IS A FREE, DROP-IN EVENT AND SO YOU DO NOT HAVE TO BOOK TICKETS.


Every Thursday, different speakers on different subjects at Bristol Central Library.



23rd November

Paul Hurley, academic

This lecture will explore ‘Man Food’ - a project looking at gender, protein and the environment and what links what we put on our plate with what’s happening in the wider environment. Does gender have a role to play? Are there food choices that are healthy for us and healthy for the planet?


30th November

Graham Scott of Wessex Archaeology

"Be quite and calm my countrymen, for what is taking place now is what you came here to do. We are all going to die, and that is what we came for. Brothers, we are drilling the death drill. I, a Zulu, say here and now that you are all my brothers... Xhosas, Swazis, Pondos, Basotho and all others, let us die like warriors. We are the sons of Africa. Raise your war cries my brothers, for though they made us leave our assegais back in the kraals, our voices are left with our bodies..."

So cried out the Reverend Dyobha to the men of the South African Native Labour Corps as the Liverpool troop ship Mendi sank beneath them on a cold, dark night in the English Channel in February 1917. A couple of hours later hundreds were dead, drowned in the freezing cold water, one of South Africa’s worst maritime disasters. Graham Scott of Wessex Archaeology will tell the story of these men and of the international labour system that helped Britain survive the First World War and will explain how their sacrifice became a symbol of equality and justice in the subsequent struggle against Apartheid South Africa.

The 1914-18 Centenary Commemorations have arguably led to a greater awareness that the First World War was a true world-wide war, involving people from many nations and colonies. Graham invites you to give your response to the sacrifices made by these diverse peoples in a short discussion following the talk.

7th December

Lucienne Boyce, historical novelist and suffrage historian

“The enormous condescension of posterity”: Writing Ordinary
History isn’t just about kings and queens. In this talk, Lucienne looks at the challenges and rewards of researching and writing about the “ordinary” people of the eighteenth century.

14th December

Christopher Jarrold, Professor of Psychology

An overview of how language works and how children acquire it, illustrated by three legends of English literature

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Bristol Central Library

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BS1

United Kingdom

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