Lunchtime Talk - Drowning and resuscitation in eighteenth-century Europe
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Lunchtime Talk - Drowning and resuscitation in eighteenth-century Europe

Lunchtime Talk - Drowning and resuscitation in eighteenth-century Europe

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Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery, Parkinson Court

University of Leeds

Woodhouse Lane

Leeds

LS2 9JT

United Kingdom

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In the early eighteenth century, anxieties about the certainty of death were fuelled by news reports of the revival of the seemingly drowned and accounts of people who had been inadvertently buried alive. Physicians increasingly experimented with techniques to revive the 'apparently dead', notably the administration of tobacco smoke enemas. Their work gained support from the public because it offered hope in the face of numerous deaths from drowning in ponds, lakes and rivers. Tobacco had exploded in popularity in Europe in the seventeenth century following its introduction from the New World and was thought to have medical properties as a stimulant.

Ranging from the canals of Venice to the Serpentine in London's Hyde Park, this talk explores the history of early resuscitation techniques, the development of societies which promoted and rewarded the administration of 'first aid', and their medical and cultural implications.

This talk is free, but spaces are limited so booking is essential.

For further information please contact the Gallery by email: gallery@leeds.ac.uk or telephone: (0113) 343 9803

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Date and Time

Location

Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery, Parkinson Court

University of Leeds

Woodhouse Lane

Leeds

LS2 9JT

United Kingdom

View Map

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