£120

Michael Rosen’s Reading Rebellion Conference 2018

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Goldsmiths, University of London

8 Lewisham Way

Professor Stuart Hall Building

London

SE14 6NW

United Kingdom

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Refunds up to 7 days before event

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Following last year’s very successful conference, Goldsmiths’ Department of Educational Studies is delighted to announce that ‘Michael Rosen’s Reading Revolution Conference’ is running again. In his position as Professor of Children’s Literature at Goldsmiths, Michael Rosen has become increasingly concerned that a draconian assessment regime in schools has led to reading for enjoyment being marginalised. He believes now is time for a ‘reading revolution’ where teachers, parents and students take control of the agenda and put reading for pleasure at the heart of what they do. To this end, a unique and thought-provoking conference has been convened in which leading experts and ‘reading revolutionaries’ come together to offer practical advice and rigorous insight into how a reading revolution might work.

Information on Keynotes, Workshops and Speakers

Introduction by Maggie Pitfield, Head of Educational Studies and opening address by Michael Rosen with post-graduate students discussing alternative ways of reading (10:00 - 11:00)

Mindful Reading in Education (Francis Gilbert) (11:30 - 12:45)

In this workshop, Francis Gilbert will outline what mindfulness is and show how mindful practices can be used by teachers to develop their own reading practices, and then apply these lessons in their own teaching. The workshop will include some short meditations and will give delegates a chance to consider how mindful reading practices might be used in the classroom.

Dr Francis Gilbert is a Lecturer in Education at Goldsmiths. He is course leader for PGCE English and Head of the MA in Creative Writing and Education. He has written a number of books, including I’m A Teacher, Get Me Out of Here (2004) and The Mindful English Teacher (2017). He practises mindfulness regularly and has found it has really helped with his teaching and life generally.

Migrating texts to bring reading alive (Vicky Macleroy & Mirela Dumić) (11:30 - 12:45)

In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to work with a children’s story Hedgehog’s Home by Branko Ćopić. It is a story that crosses political divisions and is about caring for your natural habitat and the meaning of home. In migrating a text, delegates will experiment with adapting and translating the children’s story across modes and languages/dialects; learn how to use a digital tool to tell a story; and reflect upon the process and how it can be used in the classroom.

Dr Vicky Macleroy is a Senior Lecturer in English in Education at Goldsmiths. She is Head of the Centre for Language, Culture and Learning and Principal Investigator with Jim Anderson of the Critical Connections: Multilingual Digital Storytelling Project (2012-2017), an international project to boost 21st literacy in schools. She is co-editor of the book ‘Multilingual Digital Storytelling: engaging creatively and critically with literacy’ (2016). Mirela Dumić works at the International School of London (London) and a multidisciplinary institute at the University of Surrey. She has been a lead teacher in the Critical Connections project since 2013 and her background in translation and literature informed the process of literary text adaptation and translation for the screen. She contributed to a book project on multilingual childhoods ‘Growing Up with Languages: Reflections on Multilingual Childhoods’ by Claire Thomas (2012).

Using Drama to make reading (more than) enjoyable (Maggie Pitfield, Theo Bryer) (11:30 - 12:45)

What do we mean by reading through drama? This practical workshop takes as its starting point Barrs proposal that in reading ‘we enact or perform a text, aloud or silently, using for this purpose our ordinary powers of roletaking’ (Barrs, 1987, 9). Theo Bryer (UCL/IoE) and Maggie Pitfield will lead participants in dramatic engagements with a text and through the process make a case for drama being at the heart of reading.

Maggie is a Senior Lecturer and Head of the Department of Educational Studies. Prior to joining the department in 2002 she taught Drama and English, and latterly Media Studies, in London secondary schools, a career spanning some 24 years. Maggie has had considerable experience as a Head of English. She was also Chair of Harrow Teachers’ Consultative Committee for a number of years, and was a member of the BBC English Education Consultative Group.

Tackling controversial issues: children's literature about refugees (Julia Hope) (11:30 - 12:45)

Julia Hope joined the department in 2003, after 17 years teaching in inner London schools, and two years teaching in Zimbabwe. With experience mainly in the Primary Sector, she has taught across the age ranges from Foundation stage up to Secondary, as a class teacher, English teacher, EAL teacher, and Refugee Support teacher. Immediately prior to teaching at Goldsmiths, Julia was a freelance Education Consultant, with particular expertise in Family Learning, running courses for refugee parents, and conducting training for Lewisham Education Authority.

Julia Hope is Head of Programme for the MA in Children’s Literature, in the Department of Educational Studies at Goldsmiths College. She teaches on modules for the Issues and Debates pathway of the MA in Children’s Literature, including Theory and Reading Practice, Researching Children’s Literature, and Children’s Literature and Cultural Diversity, as well as supervising dissertations on the course. Julia also lectures on the PGCE Primary programme, where she was previously the Academic Coordinator. She now teaches on the Studies in Professional Issues in Education (SPIRE) module and runs her own specialism in Children’s Literature for Primary teaching students. She runs a module on the BA in Education, Culture and Society called “Children’s Literature and Controversy”.

Reading as a materially situated practice: some ‘slant’ stories from the field (Kate Pahl) (13:30)

This talk will explore the idea of reading as a material activity, both in terms of reading matter being material, but also will explore how objects can become part of the experience of reading. This can produce a very different ‘feel’ to reading, that might feel odd, different, slant or rebellious. Dr Pahl will tell some stories from research which looked at objects, stories and apply this to how reading materially can be a different experience. How can reading matter in a different way?

Kate Pahl is Professor of Arts and Literacy at MMU and her work has spanned literacy studies, co-production and arts methodologies. She is the author, with Jennifer Rowsell of ‘Artifactual Literacies’ (Teachers College 2010) and ‘Materializing Literacies' (Bloomsbury Academic 2014). She is currently involved in an AHRC research project on Feeling Odd in the World of Education, with Professor Rachel Holmes, at Manchester Metropolitan University.

Finding A Voice - an act of rebellion? (Sita Brahmachari) (14:30)

Sita writes: “All the young characters in the stories I’ve written for children and young people have needed to rebel in small and momentous ways in order to be heard. In a broad brush stroke what I understand the term to mean is finding a way to express yourself, having a sense of agency and power that who you are, your culture, your history, your landscapes, the way you speak and express yourself have value. I’ll argue that the powerful feeling of ‘belonging’ this produces can have major positive impacts on the ability for all students to reach their full potential. In this speech I will explore the way in which my young rebel characters have navigated the journey to finding a voice at critical rites of passage moments in their lives. I’ll talk about why I’ve made it my mission as a writer for children and young people to step into the stories and characters of so many diverse communities and why that’s so critically important today more than ever.”

Sita Brahmachari’s creative projects with diverse communities are at the heart of her writing. She has an MA in Arts Education (Central School of Speech and Drama). She has been Writer in Residence for The Book Trust and Islington Centre for Refugees and Migrants. Amnesty International has endorsed her work as upholding the rights of children and families. Sita has worked in theatre and co-created a play inspired by Shaun Tan’s novel The Arrival (playscript by Bloomsbury). Her debut novel for young people Artichoke Hearts, won the Waterstones Children’s Book Prize and her subsequent novels (Macmillan Children’s Books) have been nominated for major awards, Jasmine Skies, Tender Earth, Red Leaves and Kite Spirit. For Barrington Stoke she has written Worry Angels, Brace Mouth False Teeth, Car Wash Wish and Zebra Crossing Soul Song. Her forthcoming novella Corey’s Rock (Otter Barry Books) is illustrated by Jane Ray. She has contributed stories to a number of anthologies with a human rights focus and is currently under commission to Orion books for two further novels. She is the recipient of the UK Honour (2018) for her novel Tender Earth from The International Board of Books for Young People.

Final Word with Michael Rosen (15:30)

Readings & summing up


Tickets include food and drinks (tea, coffee, water, juice, pastries and lunch) and a delegate pack.

Registration (09:30) Morning Break (11:00) Lunch (12:45)

For directions and how to find us please visit https://www.gold.ac.uk/find-us/

Please note that this event will be filmed and photographed for educational and information purposes.

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Date and Time

Location

Goldsmiths, University of London

8 Lewisham Way

Professor Stuart Hall Building

London

SE14 6NW

United Kingdom

View Map

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 7 days before event

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