Michael Rosen's Writers and Teachers' Conference at Goldsmiths, 2nd July

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Location

Location

Stuart Hall Building

Lower Ground Lecture Theatre

Goldsmiths, University of London

SE14 6NW

United Kingdom

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Top writers and teachers are coming together to work out how to teach writing effectively in schools; join them!

Professor Michael Rosen - one of the UK’s most popular writers for children – and the Goldsmiths, University of London Department of Educational Studies are bringing teachers together with some of the best writers in their fields for a free conference on Saturday 2 July.

Michael and other Goldsmiths tutors have invited news journalists, feature writers, columnists, historians, creative writers and writer-teachers to help teachers develop their approaches to teaching writing in all subject areas.

In addition, there will be a keynote address given by Simon Wrigley and Jeni Smith who are the directors of the National Writing Project, which is a network of teachers’ writing group, run by teachers for teachers. They will also be leading their own workshop.

We have asked the writers to discuss the most important tips they have picked up in learning how to write; to talk about how they “come up” with their “stuff” as they sit down to write; the kinds of things that go through their minds as they write; how they adapt their writing for specific audiences and topics; how they edit and re-edit, and then finalise for publication.

The conference has some of the leading practitioners in their fields. There is the historian Keith Flett, science and news writer for the Times Tom Whipple, literary journalist Fiona Wilson, feature writer Melissa Benn, prize-winning novelist Ardu Vakil and Deputy Editor of the New Statesman, Helen Lewis.

Teachers are warmly invited to attend this event. We feel this conference would be of particular interest to secondary school teachers from all disciplines, but particularly would be useful for student teachers and any teacher who wants to develop their expertise about writing. Science teachers could really benefit from attending Tom Whipple’s workshop, while English teachers could benefit from the Creative Writing workshop, Keith Flett’s workshop would be of interest of course to historians, but also any teacher who has to improve their pupils’ history writing skills, such as teachers of classics, RE and Media. Delegates will have a chance to discuss various writing strategies with the writers and then will have a go at writing their own pieces. The aim would be to publish some of these articles in a book, blog or anthology depending upon delegates’ preferences.

The conference will address the following questions, among others:

  • What classroom situations have produced the best writing?
  • Are there formulas for good writing?
  • How do you get your pupils down to write?
  • Are there differences in how you get pupils to write in the various genres: poetry, fiction, non-fiction, drama scripts?
  • How do you get students to edit/re-edit?
  • Is it advisable to publish, print, circulate, blog the pupils' writing? How?

The day would consist of the following schedule:

  • 9am-10am Register/Welcome/Coffee
  • 10am-11am Michael Rosen and other Goldsmiths tutors to introduce the conference, explain the rationale and why it is needed.
  • 11am-11.30am Break
  • 11.30am-12.30pm Workshops with professional writers who will work with delegates on explaining how they write. Teachers will discuss how these strategies might be implemented in the classroom.
  • 12.30pm-1.30pm Working lunch
  • 1.30pm-2pm Simon Wrigley and Jeni Smith, directors of the National Writing Project, key note speech about Teachers as Writers movement
  • 2pm-3pm Teachers write their articles in workshops OR participate in a Teachers as Writers workshop led by Jeni Smith and Simon Wrigley.
  • 3pm-4pm Reflections and readings.

This event would be suitable for the following professionals:

  • Any teacher interested in improving their ability to teach writing;
  • Primary school teachers;
  • English teachers;
  • Literacy co-ordinators;
  • Humanities teachers; history, geography and Religious Education teachers;
  • Science teachers;
  • Anyone interested in the teaching of writing in education.

(Please note: refreshments and lunch may be purchased from the cafes on the Goldsmiths site or from any of the cafes in the local New Cross area)

Date and Time

Location

Stuart Hall Building

Lower Ground Lecture Theatre

Goldsmiths, University of London

SE14 6NW

United Kingdom

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