Order, Conflict Resolution and Crime - Centre for Criminal Justice Studies...

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Maurice Keyworth Boardroom

Maurice Keyworth Building

Belle Vue Road

LS3 1DB

United Kingdom

View Map

Event description

Description

The Centre of Criminal Justice Studies, University of Leeds is delighted to invite you to a lecture by Professor Philip Stenning, Honorary Professor, University KwaZulu-Natal, Durban & Adjunct Professor Griffith Criminology Institute.

Abstract

Title: "Order, conflict resolution and crime: re-thinking the role of the state in the 21st Century"

In 1651, Thomas Hobbes, in his book Leviathan, argued in favour of all men [sic.] surrendering their exclusive, inherent right to govern themselves to a ruler or “Assembly of Men”, as the only way of avoiding a “war of all against all”, in which life is “poor, nasty, brutish and short”. Since then, the state has increasingly claimed a monopoly over the legitimate use of force, and the right to make laws against crimes against the state, persons and property, and to establish criminal justice institutions to enforce them.

In this talk I briefly trace the history of this liberal democratic idea of the relationship between the citizen and the state in the governance of crime and disorder, through the 18th, 19th and 20th Centuries, to the early years of the 21st century. I then consider, in light of the current state of crime and the criminal justice system in Britain, the arguments that have been raised during the last 50 years or so, suggesting that the time may have come to reconsider the ‘social contract’ that was advocated by thinkers such as Hobbes, John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, particularly as it applies to the role of the state with respect to the governance of crime and disorder.

I pose the question as to whether the role of the state in this respect has exceeded reasonable and rational limits, and if so, how it might best be ‘rolled back’ in favour of greater citizens’ responsibility and participation with respect to addressing threats against their safety and security.

About the Speaker

Dr. Philip Stenning is an Adjunct Professor at the Griffith Criminology Institute, at Griffith University, having previously been a Professor in its School of Criminology and Criminal Justice. Before that, Dr. Stenning was a Professor of Criminology at Keele University, United Kingdom, Professor and Director of the Institute of Criminology at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, and Associate Professor at the Centre of Criminology at the University of Toronto.

Dr. Stenning holds a Doctor of Law from the University of Toronto, a Master of Law from York University (Ontario), and Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Law and a Master of Arts from Cambridge University (UK). His research interests include public and private policing, the prosecution process and prosecutor-government relations, accountability in criminal justice, Aboriginal policing and justice, gender-based violence, and domestic and international criminal law and procedure. He has published 5 books on policing and prosecutions, 17 research reports (including one on Police Governance in First Nations in Ontario, in 1996), as well as over 50 academic journal articles and 40 book chapters, during his academic career.

In addition to his academic work during these years, Dr. Stenning has served as a consultant and adviser to a wide range of government departments and commissions of inquiry in a range of countries including Canada, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, Venezuela and Brazil, as well as to the Council of Europe and the United Nations. He has been a member of the Board of Directors of the John Howard Societies of Toronto (1987-1990) and Ontario (1988-1990) and of the Board of Directors of the Elizabeth Fry Society of Toronto (1990-1993). From 2003-2005 he was Vice-President of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology, was a member of its Committee of Management in 2015-2016, and in 2005 was the Convenor of its 18th Annual Conference in Wellington, New Zealand. From 2012-2016 he was Co-Editor of the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, and in 2013 he served as Professor in Residence at the Australian Institute of Police Management.

All welcome, but registration in advance is required.

Location Details

Maurice Keyworth Boardroom
Maurice Keyworth Building
University of Leeds
LS2 9JT

Please use postcode LS6 1AN for sat navs.

You can also find the Maurice Keyworth Building on the campus map.

All welcome. This is a free event, though registration is required.

The information you provide will be held by the School of Law, University of Leeds in accordance with the University's Data Protection Policy. We will use this information to provide you with updates relating to the event you have registered to attend and may contact you following the event to request feedback (feedback is optional). Information will be retained until the event has passed, unless you request to be kept informed about future events from us.

Date and Time

Location

Maurice Keyworth Boardroom

Maurice Keyworth Building

Belle Vue Road

LS3 1DB

United Kingdom

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved