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Oxford School Improvement Expert Events - Teaching for Big Ideas in Mathema...

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Carmel College

The Headlands

Darlington

DL3 8RW

United Kingdom

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I would like to invite you to join me from 9:45am on 13th October 2017 to reflect on Teaching for Big Ideas in Mathematics.

The session, sponsored by Oxford University Press and organised by Archimedes Maths Hub, offers the opportunity to attend a full day of professional development, looking in detail at:

  • What is a Big Idea?
  • What are some Big Ideas in Mathematics?
  • Planning and Teaching Mathematics with a Focus on Big Ideas.

Thank you, I look forward to meeting you.

With Best Wishes

Mike Askew (Independent Mathematics Expert)

*There will be a non-profit charge of £15 made by the organiser to cover the cost of the venue and refreshments.

Programme - Approx. timings

9:45 – 10:00 Registration

10.00 - 10.10 Welcome & introductions

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10.10 - 11.10 What is a Big Idea?

For an idea to be ‘Big’ it must have currency across all the years of primary schooling. This is important because it means children get to revisit Big Ideas across the year groups. The ideas then grow and develop, while there is a core of familiarity on which to build. This means that all children in a class can be engaged in thinking about a Big Idea at different developmental levels; working with Big Ideas is a means of dealing with classroom diversity and promoting inclusive communities. Mike Askew: Independent Primary Mathematics expert

11.10 – 11.15 Oxford School Improvement Support

Jill Yeardley, Oxford University Press

11.15 – 12.00 Refreshments & display

12.00 - 1.30 Why are Big Ideas in Mathematics important?

What are some Big Ideas in mathematics? In this part of the workshop, we will examine the nature and content of several big ideas, including: • Meanings and symbols: The same symbols or number sentence can be used to model different realistic situations and different symbols or number sentences can be used to model the same realistic situation. • Equivalence: There are infinitely many ways to represent numbers, measures and number sentences. • Classification: Mathematical objects - numbers and shapes - can be described, compared, classified, and analysed by their properties. Mike Askew: Independent Primary Mathematics expert

1.30 – 2.30 Lunch & Resource Display

2.30 – 3.45 Looking further at Big Ideas.

Planning and teaching mathematics with a focus on Big Ideas. Taking a particular Big Idea as an example, in this final session we will look at practical suggestions for long- and short-term planning with a focus on that ‘Big Idea’ and how this can be embedded throughout teaching. Mike Askew: Independent Primary Mathematics expert

3.45 Closing session & depart
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Location

Carmel College

The Headlands

Darlington

DL3 8RW

United Kingdom

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