£15 – £55

Parliaments and Popular Sovereignty Conference

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

People's History Museum

Left Bank

Manchester

M3 3ER

United Kingdom

View Map

Refund Policy

Refund Policy

No Refunds

Friends Who Are Going
Event description

Description

The 150th anniversary of the 1867 Reform Act, which made important strides towards the inclusion of working people amongst the electorate, is an occasion for wider reflection on the claims that have been made that parliaments should be (or are) truly representative of the people. Our conference will facilitate discussion across the traditional boundaries of early modern and modern historical research and will include the Irish parliament and legislatures of British colonies alongside the houses of parliament in Westminster.

For full details, please visit the conference website.

The keynote lecture will be given by Dr Katrina Navickas (University of Hertfordshire), and confirmed speakers include Richard Huzzey (Durham University), Amanda Goodrich (Open University), Anthony Howe (University of East Anglia) and Philip Salmon (History of Parliament Trust). Our programme includes papers concerning any part of the British world in the period 1640-1886, on themes such as:

  • Revolutionary, radical, or reform movements championing popular sovereignty or claiming its mandate for their designs;
  • Instruments for the representation of popular sovereignty, whether the electoral franchise, mass mobilisation through petitions and meetings, or the claims of the press;
  • Comparative or imperial histories of popular sovereignty within the British world;
  • Debates over the composition of electorates and candidates for representative institutions, including the use of property or racial qualifications;
  • Contests over political representation, as reflected in demands, bills and Acts for parliamentary reform;
  • The performance of popular sovereignty in petitions, election rituals, and polling;
  • Clashes between representative bodies claiming the authority of – or rejecting the value of – popular sovereignty;
  • The language of popular sovereignty, including its contested meanings and the imagination of “the people”;
  • The intellectual histories of parliamentary and popular sovereignty, including “virtual representation”.

Full programme details will be available on the conference website.

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

People's History Museum

Left Bank

Manchester

M3 3ER

United Kingdom

View Map

Refund Policy

No Refunds

Save This Event

Event Saved