Free

Postgraduate Animal Studies Symposium (PASS)

Actions and Detail Panel

Free

Event Information

Share this event

Date and time

Location

Location

Online event

Event description
A two-day online training and conference event, showcasing international postgrad research students working in the field of animal studies.

About this event

PASS responds to a need for an animal studies knowledge exchange event which is specifically tailored to postgraduate researchers (PGRs), as existing events have tended to showcase established researchers.

We aim to forge new partnerships with animal studies communities across higher education institutions internationally, providing researchers with the opportunity to build interdisciplinary connections, and to benefit from knowledge exchange and networking. It will be the first event of its kind, free to attend and offering a programme designed specifically for the needs of PGRs.

Running over two days, PASS will feature speaker panels, five-minute thesis presentations and a plenary address by early career reseacher Dr Briony Wickes, Research Fellow in the School of English, Drama and Film at the University College Dublin.

The event, while showcasing the work of PGRs, is open to all. We warmly invite students, PGs, PGRs, ECRs, established academics and anyone else interested in animal studies, to attend. PASS provides a platform for the brilliant and innovative new research being done within the field.

Read the full programme for the symposium below, or download a PDF copy here.

PROGRAMME

(All times are BST)

MONDAY 24TH MAY

9.20am - 10.30am

Welcome

Nicole Cumming (Universities of Glasgow and Strathclyde), Rebecca Jones (University of Strathclyde) and Ali Ryland (University of Strathclyde)

5-minute-thesis - session 1

Each 5-minute-thesis session will include 6-7 presenters who will give 5-minute overviews of their current research projects. The presentations will be followed by c.25 minute ‘breakout rooms’ that will be split thematically and will allow for open discussion and networking opportunities within a smaller group setting. You will be asked to select your preferred breakout room upon booking. Full details of speakers and groups can be found below.

10.30am - 12pm

The Animal Salon - PGR workshop

This workshop is now fully-booked and we are operating a waiting list. If you would like to be added to the waiting list email animalstudies.symposium@gmail.com. Full details of the workshop can be found below.

12.45pm - 2.20pm

Panel 1 | Urban animals: interactions with human and no-longer-human spaces

2.40pm - 4pm

These panels run simultaneously. You will be asked to select your preferred panel at booking. Full details of speakers and panels can be found below.

Panel 2 | Uncomfortable boundaries: animal flesh, gender and monstrosity

Panel 3 | Thinking beyond the human: conceptual forces, post-domestic care and de-extinction

4.15pm - 5.30pm

Plenary | Dr Briony Wickes (University College Dublin)

TUESDAY 25TH MAY

9.30am - 11am

A Slow Ritual of Care - PGR workshop part II

All participants are warmly invited to observe this workshop. Please email animalstudies.symposium@gmail.com to attend. Full details of the workshop can be found below.

11.15am - 12.20pm

Welcome back

5-minute-thesis - session 2

1.10pm - 2.30pm

These panels run simultaneously. You will be asked to select your preferred panel at booking. Full details of speakers and panels can be found below.

Panel 4 | Animal characters: reading the non-human in works of fiction

Panel 5 | Human-animal interactions: duties of care, animal agency and multispecies ethnography

2.45pm - 3.45pm

5-minute-thesis - session 3

4pm - 5.45pm

Panel 6 | Historic human-animal relationships: animal work, animal companions and the development of contemporary attitudes

Closing comments

PLENARY ADDRESS

Dr Briony Wickes (University College Dublin)

Briony Wickes is a Research Fellow in the School of English, Drama, and Film at University College Dublin, working on the European Research Council project, “European Migrants in the British Imagination: Victorian and Neo-Victorian Culture (VICTEUR)”. Before joining UCD in 2021, she worked as a Lecturer in Victorian Literature at the University of Glasgow, and taught at King’s College London, where she also received her PhD in 2019. Her research examines the cultural construction of ‘the nonhuman’ as a category of social difference in the nineteenth century, and beyond. She is currently writing a monograph, Animal Materials: Ecology, Settlement, and the Nineteenth-Century Novel, 1815-1910, which make the case for the representation of the human-animal divide, reflected in selected nineteenth-century texts, as an ideological lynchpin for settler colonialism. Briony is the current Assistant Membership Secretary of the British Association for Victorian Studies (BAVS) and also manages the Nineteenth-Century Matters fellowship, an initiative funded jointly by BAVS and the British Association for Romantic Studies that aims to support early career researchers in the Arts and Humanities.

PAPER PANELS

Each panel is made up of three presenters who will give c.20-minute papers, followed by 20 minutes for open questions. Panels 2 & 3 and 4 & 5 will run parallel to each other.

Full abstracts and biographies for all presenters can be accessed via this link - PASS abstracts & bios

Panel 1 | Urban animals: interactions with human and no-longer-human spaces

Philippe Depairon (Université de Montréal, Canada) - Horses, Boars, Ostriches: Notes from Fukushima, 10 years later

Aashish Gokhale (Ambedkar University, India) - Making Room: Monkey-Human Entanglements in Campbell Bay, Great Nicobar Island

Susan Haris (IIT Delhi, India) - Waste, Space and Life-Worlds

Panel 2 | Uncomfortable boundaries: animal flesh, gender and monstrosity

Sreyashi Ray (University of Minnesota, USA) - Meat, Morality, Masculinity: The Nonhuman Gaze

Samantha Hind (University of Sheffield, UK) - “IT’S ALIVE”: Cultured Flesh in Mat Blackwell’s Beef

Jonathan Thornton (University of Liverpool, UK) - Subversion of Insects as the Monstrous Feminine in Lisa Tuttle’s ‘Wives’ and C. J. Cherryh’s Serpent’s Reach

Panel 3 | Thinking beyond the human: conceptual forces, post-domestic care and de-extinction

Pablo P. Castelló (Royal Holloway, University of London, UK) - Beyond Intersectionality, Towards Interconstitutionality

Marie Leth-Espensen (Lund University, Sweden) - Caring for animals in a time of ecological crisis. Law, human-animal relations, and the post-domestic challenge

Katie Prosser (University of Oxford, UK) - Is De-Extinction a Relation We Should Not Create?

Panel 4 | Animal characters: reading the non-human in works of fiction

Lucy Nield (University of Liverpool, UK) - “I want very much to make Master proud of me” Using Dog-Hybrids in Speculative Fiction to challenge the concept of Dog ‘Loyalty’

Lauren Cullen (University of Oxford, UK) - Criminal Creatures in Nineteenth-Century Detective Fiction

Sofia Duarte (University of Valencia, Spain) - Nonhuman Animals in Margaret Atwood’s Fictional Worlds

Panel 5 | Human-animal interactions: duties of care, animal agency and multispecies ethnography

Kate Goldie (University of Southampton, UK) - Livestock out of place: performing care outside the farm

Nicole Gosling (University of Lincoln, UK) - Locating the Animal in Veterinary Investigations of Livestock Disease: A Case Study of Footrot in Sheep

Holly Marriott Webb (Aurhus University, Denmark) & Alex Mullan (University of Roehampton, UK) - We’re Going on a Goat Hunt: Dual-Perspective Multispecies Ethnography in the Cheviots

Panel 6 | Historic human-animal relationships: animal work, animal companions and the development of contemporary attitudes

Chiara Stefanoni (University of Bergamo, Italy) - “Toffee-Nosed”: The Rise of the Modern Slaughterhouse, Hygiene and MiasmasLuise Elsaesser (European University Institute, Italy) - The working horse population in Britain: Economic Use and Disappearance of Horses, 1870-1950

Victoria Shea (University of Liverpool, UK) - Good Dog, Bad Dog: Enslaved People and Dogs in the Antebellum American South

Wessel Broekhuis (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Netherlands - ‘Animals brought from every part of the globe’ - A Study of the Imperialist Aspect of the First Generation of Zoological Societies in the Nineteenth Century

5-MINUTE-THESIS SESSIONS

Each session will include 6-7 presenters who will give 5-minute overviews of their current research projects. The presentations will be followed by c.25 minute ‘breakout rooms’ that will be split thematically and will allow for open discussion and networking opportunities within a smaller group setting.

SESSION 1

Legal and ethical considerations

Katharina Braun (Freie Universität Berlin, Germany) - Animals, Free Speech, and Democracy: Legal Responses to Undercover Footage

Viola Ferraroni (Cattolica University, Italy) - The evolution of Animal welfare in the European Union legislation

Katie Prosser (University of Oxford, UK) - Climate Justice, Animals, and Moral Status: Does a duty of adaptation extend to non-human animals?

Historic animal advocacy

Charlotte O'Neill (University of Sheffield, UK) - Edward Carpenter: Beyond the Human

Simon Kleinert (Universität Kassel, Germany) - Reverence for life? The diachronic, reciprocal negotiation process of human-animal relations in the first German vegetarian movement from about 1850 to 1935

Animal behaviour

Amanda Puitiza (CUNY, USA) - Exploring Behavioral Flexibility, Problem-Solving, and Innovation in Captive Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus)

SESSION 2

Artistic representations of animals

Kathrin Lang (Goethe University, Germany) - Ornithophonia. Vogellieder in literature and music from 1850 to 1920

Eline D. Tabak (Universities of Bristol & Bath Spa, UK) - 'Between the Insect Hordes and Ourselves’: Imaginaries of Insect Decline from the 1960s Onwards

Animal poetry

Daniel Leonard (Boston University, USA) - The Dog-Eared Page: The Relational Animal of Twentieth-century and Contemporary American Poetry

Lu Shun (Shanghai Normal University, China) - Ecocriticism - Seamus Heaney's Georgics

Interspecies well-being

Natalia Ciecierska- Holmes (University of Nottingham, UK) - Examining the Interplay between Understandings of Nutritional Health and Well-Being for Humans and Companion Animals: A social and ethical cross-cultural comparison

Vijay Rawat (Central Queensland University, Australia) - A systematic review and meta-analysis for the effectiveness of animal-assisted therapy on mental health.

SESSION 3

Colonial and post-colonial contexts

Mariska Jung (Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium) - Postcolonial Europe and it’s Animal Other: On Race, Religion and Animals

Nicolo Paolo P Ludovice (The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong) - Domesticated Geographies: Animals and the Making of Modern Health in the Philippines, 1860-1935

Annika Dörner (University of Erfurt, Germany) - Trading Animals / Animals that act. Animal-Human- Relations between the Horn of Africa, Germany and the World.

Practice based considerations of nature

Hannah Imlach (University of Edinburgh, UK) - Close Encounters; art, presence and environmental engagement at Loch Lomond (practice based)

Kay McCrann (Portsmouth University, UK) - Minibeasts, mark-making and me: Contemporary embodied drawing approaches to natural history enquiry (practice based)

Animals and religion

Ruby Cotter (University of Chester, UK) - Food for Catholic Thought: Hearing the Cry of the Animal in Laudato Si’

PGR WORKSHOPS

The Animal Salon, Maria Sledmere (University of Glasgow)

A salon is an elegantly furnished room, used for the reception of guests. In this workshop, we’re going to let the animals in: that includes us, as humans, and all kinds of more-than-humans. The octopus, mosquito, sea wolf, goldfish, guinea pig, anonymous google doc critter and everything in-between. By taking this hospitable approach, we’ll move through creative writing exercises which explore the relationship between aesthetics and ethics when it comes to animal poetics — a salon, after all, can also be an exhibition or beauty parlour.

The workshop features readings of contemporary animal poetry, from Anna Cathenka to Samantha Walton, with reference to theories of animals and entanglement from Jacques Derrida, Donna Haraway, Sophie Lewis and others. We’ll experiment with animal ‘still lifes in motion’, writing to and from images, dipping into nudibranch youtube, considering the page as an ecosystem, shifting between scientific and taxonomic registers and thinking carefully about the relationship of form and content when it comes to animal-centred ecopoetics. The Animal Salon is a studio for developing a writing practice of care, play, attunement and dialogue, while responding to creative-critical materials which open up new possibilities for ecological imaginaries.

No prior reading or previous experience with creative writing is required, and everyone is encouraged to attend. We’ll be focusing more on individual writing exercises rather than formal feedback, and there’s no pressure to share your work. The salon is designed to be an interactive and participatory space, and you’re encouraged, but not required, to respond and share samples of your experiments on the Zoom chat. All you need is a working internet connection, Zoom and your preferred materials for writing.

A slow ritual of care (part II), Bentley Crudgington (Animal Research Nexus)

Blending mail-art, crafting circles and consequences, this slow ritual of care will bring a small group together, over two interactive workshops, to make felt research mice and to collectively decide upon their fates.

This experimental encounter will create a space to critically consider the difference between being careful and care-full in public engagement, the vulnerabilities of bodies and what lingers after encounters.

These facilitated workshops will blend performance, participation and reflection to create a slow ritual of care. Participants will receive materials and instructions to open together at the first workshop. Participants shall craft mice together before posting their mouse to a fellow participant. The fates of these mice will be explored at the second interactive, open workshop.


		Postgraduate Animal Studies Symposium (PASS) image
Share with friends

Date and time

Location

Online event

Save This Event

Event Saved