Professorial Inaugural Lecture Series: Professor Martha Clokie
Free
Professorial Inaugural Lecture Series: Professor Martha Clokie

Professorial Inaugural Lecture Series: Professor Martha Clokie

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Lecture Theatre 1 and Atrium

Centre for Medicine

University of Leicester

Leicester

LE1 7RH

United Kingdom

View Map

Friends Who Are Going
Event description

Description


Professor Martha Clokie gives a lecture titled

"Bacteriophages: micromanipulators of the bacterial world and a treasure trove of novel antibacterials"

Synopsis:

Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses that infect bacteria. They are the most abundant and diverse biological entities on earth, and all bacteria have specific viruses that target and infect them, either causing death, or profound changes in their biology. My journey with bacteriophages started 16 years ago when I attempted to understand how the most abundant primary producers in the ocean (cyanobacteria) were influenced by these organisms. Sequencing the genomes of these phages revealed that their physiology is closely linked to that of the cyanobacteria, and in addition to the key genes needed to make viruses, they have acquired genes involved in photosynthesis and many other bacterial processes. Clearly the viruses were key to understanding many aspects of cyanobacterial biology. Although all bacteria have these viruses, little attention has been paid to their ecological roles in many bacteria that cause human disease, and since establishing my research group at Leicester, I have spent the last decade applying an environmental and ecological framework attempting to rectify this, particularly in Clostridium difficile and in various respiratory pathogens. An ecological understanding can inform the way in which phages, or products from phages can be effectively exploited to remove or reduce bacteria from situations where they are not wanted, for example where they cause human disease. This is particularly pertinent in the era of bacterial resistance to antibiotics, and phages have the potential to be developed to treat a range of human diseases. For Clostridium difficile, my work has developed from the idea that they may be useful, to identifying and characterizing sets of viruses and establishing promising data on their efficacy at treating infection in a range of complex models. My talk will highlight my early work on environmental bacteria and show how it informed subsequent work on the selection and development of phages to treat human diseases.

FAQs

Are there ID requirements or an age limit to enter the event?

No ID requirements and we do not have an age limit

What are my transport/parking options getting to the event?

Parking will be available in the Maurice Shock car park, which is off Lancaster Road opposite the Centre for Medicine

Where can I contact the organiser with any questions?

Please contact Dr Danielle Benyon-Payne on dmrbp1@le.ac.uk

Is my registration/ticket transferrable?

Yes

Do I have to bring my printed ticket to the event?

No, we have an option to scan you in without a physical ticket

The name on the registration/ticket doesn't match the attendee. Is that okay?

That's fine, but the registration name is what we will be scanning; therefore, if you give a ticket to somebody else, make sure they are aware they will need your full name to be bale to enter.

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

Lecture Theatre 1 and Atrium

Centre for Medicine

University of Leicester

Leicester

LE1 7RH

United Kingdom

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved