Free

Satire in the Age of Brexit and Trump

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

City Arms

7 Butchery Lane

Canterbury

CT1 2JR

United Kingdom

View Map

Event description
For our second East Kent Salon we are lucky to have comedians Francis Foster and Oliver Double leading our discussion. All welcome.

About this Event

  • Satire: the use of humour, irony, exaggeration, or ridicule to expose and criticize people's stupidity or vices, particularly in the context of contemporary politics and other topical issues.

Satire has always been about challenging the politics and sensibilities of the establishment and the powerful. Many argue it serves that function today. After all, Donald Trump and Boris Johnson – widely satirised by Punt and Dennis, Josie Long, Frankie Boyle and a host of others - can hardly claim to be of humble means.

Others see much of today’s satirical comedy output as aimed – either directly or by implication - at the ordinary voting public who voted for Trump in the USA, or for Brexit in the UK. Recent polls suggest pro-Leave posh Boris is 20 points ahead of (also posh) Jeremy amongst non-posh C2DE voters. So, is satire 'punching up' or 'punching down'?

Marcus Brigstocke has talked about people walking out during his anti-Brexit routine. A recent Nish Kumar charity gig, featuring gags on Boris and Brexit, was met with boos and the throwing of a bread roll. Madeleine Grant argued in the Telegraph that ‘Brexit-deranged comedians are now Britain’s biggest bores’. Kumar joked of his critics ‘I would like to apologise if I triggered any of them’.

Chris Rock stopped playing US college gigs because of what he saw as the students’ conservative views: ‘Not in their political views — not like they’re voting Republican — but in their social views and their willingness not to offend anybody.’ US stand up Dave Chapelle has been criticised for hate speech in routines referring to MeToo and transgenderism. His response? ‘I am sorry if I hurt anybody, etc etc etc, yada yada yada, everything I am supposed to say…’ UK comedian Alistair Williams claimed that ‘Because I am a comedian that supports Brexit you can no longer find me on the comedy club circuit’.

It can seem at times that comedy is immersed in a mini culture war between wokeness and offence giving. If so, what of the casualties? Can jokes be hate speech, causing harm to minorities? Are comedians who transgress deserving of censure? How would Lenny Bruce get on in today’s comedy world? Does ‘punching up’ or ‘punching down’ really matter – after all, its only comedy.

Comedians (& much more) Francis Foster and Oliver Double will introduce the discussion, but the Salons are all about the audience – come along and discuss Comedy in the Age of Trump and Brexit in the bar at the City Arms Inn in Canterbury.

-----------------------------------------------

Read more about the speakers and the event here, or join the East Kent Salon Facebook group to stay in touch.

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

City Arms

7 Butchery Lane

Canterbury

CT1 2JR

United Kingdom

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved