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SICSA HCI Theme All Hands Meeting

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Edinburgh Napier University, Merchiston Campus

10 Colinton Road

Edinburgh

EH10 5DT

United Kingdom

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Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)

HCI Theme All hands meeting

An opportunity to meet colleagues from across Scotland researching and teaching Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), Interaction Design and User Experience (UX), catch up with the latest HCI work and present the work of your research group.

The Glass Room

Merchiston Campus

Edinburgh Napier University

Edinburgh EH10 5DT

December 12th 2017

10.00 Registration and Coffee

10.30 Introduction and Welcome David Benyon (Edinburgh Napier University)

10. 35 Opening Keynote David Geerts (Meaningful Interactions Lab, KU Leuven)

Title: Envisioning the Future of Interactive Television: using board games for ideation with end-users

11.20 SICSA HCI Labs overview Presentations are invited from SICSA HCI members

12.30 Lunch Networking and visits to the Sensorium

Guided tours of the the Centre for interaction Design’s new UX lab; The Sensorium

13.15 SICSA HCI theme Miguel Nacenta (University of St Andrews)

Martin Halvey (Strathclyde University)

SICSA Knowledge Transfer Alistair Lawson (Edinburgh Napier University)

13.30 CHI2019 at Glasgow Steve Brewster (University of Glasgow)

Steve will present the plans for CHI2019 and give everyone an opportunity to comment and offer help, perhaps.

14.15 Keynote Jason Alexander (University of Lancaster)

Title: Benefits and Barriers to the Next Generation of Physical User Interfaces

15.00 Question Time Panel: Developing HCI and UX in Scotland

Questions from the floor for a panel of HCI/UX commentators

16.00 Close and Social Event

Title: Envisioning the Future of Interactive Television: using board games for ideation with end-users

Abstract: Traditionally, Human-Computer Interaction has been strong in providing methods for the evaluation of user interfaces, but offers less support for the front-end of design. Moving from understanding your users and identifying their problems and needs to ideas for concrete solutions can indeed be quite a challenging phase in human-centred design, especially when involving end-users in the ideation process. As most end-users find it difficult to grasp the essence and opportunities of new technologies, there is a need for ideation techniques that engage people with no real interest in or affinity with technology to think about what they would like technology to do for them. At the Meaningful Interactions Lab (Mintlab), we have developed several board games to facilitate design teams in this part of the HCD process. Using board games to envision potential user experiences regarding a future product creates a surprising, pleasant and safe environment, helps to bring research participants into a ‘future state of mind’, and in turn helps to understand latent needs that are difficult to assess with more traditional HCI research methods. In this talk, I will present some of these board games, explain how they have been used in different research projects, and address how they can help designers in various ways.

Bio: David Geerts is Research Manager of the Meaningful Interactions Lab (mintlab) of KU Leuven and imec at the faculty of Social Sciences. He is specialized in human-centered design of social interactive television, and for his PhD created a set of sociability heuristics to evaluate social TV applications. He was general chair of the ACM international conference on interactive experiences for television and online video (ACM TVX2015) and is currently president of the ACM TVX steering committee. He has published more than 90 articles in various international conferences and journals, and regularly gives presentations, tutorials and guest lectures on topics related to Human-Computer Interaction.

Title: Benefits and Barriers to the Next Generation of Physical User Interfaces

Abstract:
Recent advances in materials and technology have facilitated efforts to 'rephysicalize' computing. Digital information previously locked behind the screen is being brought back out into the real world, allowing our rich tactile sense to better contribute to our interactions and understanding. These systems support user input and output through the interface's dynamic physical reconfiguration. This talk will explore the vision of dynamic physical interfaces and explore their benefits and barriers to realisation through a range of research projects conducted at Lancaster University.

Bio:
Jason is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Computing and Communications at Lancaster University. He has a BSc(Hons.) and PhD in Computer Science from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand and was previously a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Bristol. His research is broadly in Human-Computer Interaction, with a particular interest in developing novel interactive systems to bridge the physical-digital divide. His recent work focuses on the development of shape-changing interfaces-surfaces that can dynamically change their geometry based on digital content or user input. His other work has investigated novel interaction techniques using eye-gaze, haptic feedback, and gestural interaction.



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Edinburgh Napier University, Merchiston Campus

10 Colinton Road

Edinburgh

EH10 5DT

United Kingdom

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