SICSA/SIGCHI UK sponsored Sustainability in Human-Computer Interaction: Ins...

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Edinburgh Napier University

Merchiston Campus

10 Colinton Road, Room B32

Edinburgh

EH10 5DT

United Kingdom

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Description

SICSA / UKSIGCHI sponsored workshop:
Sustainability in Human-Computer Interaction – Insights from Permaculture

Thursday 1st September 2016, Edinburgh Napier University Merchiston Campus, Room B32

1015 Registration
1030 - 1045 Introductions
1045 - 1130 Keynote One (Sustainable HCI - Mike Hazas, Lancaster University)
1130 - 1200 Position papers (15 mins each ) Nick Taylor (Grow Project), Shaun Lawson (Chelsea Flower Show)
1200 - 1300 Keynote Two (
Work Less, Waste Nothing, Share Abundance) - Graham Bell, author, teacher, gardener, agent for change)
1300 - 1400 Lunch
1400 - 1600 Group work / brainstorming / presentations – permaculture, sustainability and HCI

Position papers deadline: Sunday 21st August.

Send position papers to Callum Egan (callum.egan@napier.ac.uk)

Co-chairs David Benyon (
d.benyon@napier.ac.uk) & Callum Egan (callum.egan@napier.ac.uk)

Summary
Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research into sustainability has been a hot topic for around 10 years. During this time notions of an Anthropocene have propagated throughout research communities - centralizing humankind’s agency in environmental degradation. Many CHI and other workshops have wrestled with the complexities, paradoxes and politics of this often-contentious field of enquiry. However, HCI is also a solution-focused field, so this workshop seeks to understand ways that HCI can be ‘re-made’ a sustainable practice and perspective. Recent workshops have called for the sustainable HCI community to draw on insights from fields outside of traditional HCI to move the research forward. Thus, this workshop looks to the solution-focused design practice and philosophy of Permaculture as an approach to addressing sustainability - focusing on its design principles and ethics. Patrick Whitefield defines Permaculture as “ a design system for human habitats which work with nature rather than against it. It is modeled on natural systems, and makes use of both traditional and modern science.”

This workshop invites the submission of position papers, and the presentation of (10 min) position statements. Each position paper should be submitted to Callum Egan (callum.egan@napier.ac.uk) as a single PDF file, not longer than two pages in length, and containing a description of one of the following

· a sustainable HCI design future, or

· how HCI research can help achieve sustainability, or

· un-sustainable HCI practices

Mike Hazas is a senior lecturer in the School of Computing and Communications at Lancaster University. His research is concerned with everyday practices and technologies, and how they can be related to sustainability. These include practices like playing, working or doing the laundry, and their connection to energy demand and wider impacts such as greenhouse gas emissions. He applies multidisciplinary observational approaches, which juxtapose quantitative measures of demand and impact, and qualitative/quantitative data from everyday life (e.g. room occupancy, appliance times-of-use, routines of practice, and social meanings and expectations). Specific empirical sites have included cooking, thermal comfort and digital media and entertainment. With Lisa Nathan, Mike is co-editing an upcoming Routledge volume entitled Digital Technology and Sustainability, which seeks to advance prevalent debates in sustainable HCI.
Website:
http://www.research.lancs.ac.uk/portal/en/people/Mike-Hazas

Graham Bell lives and works in the Scottish Borders. With his wife he has created the oldest intentional food forest garden in the UK – Garden Cottage. He has written two books on Permaculture, the Permaculture Way and the Permaculture Garden - introductions to what Permaculture means in a Northern temperate climate and the society that goes with it. He has taught Permaculture on four continents. After many years engaging with business and politicians in his work to get permaculture principles understood and used by people who govern and direct the world's economies he has returned to teaching courses and restarted a North Hardy Plant Nursery specifically designed to support Forest Gardeners.
Website:
http://grahambell.org/

Associated links:
Permaculture ethics:
https://knowledgebase.permaculture.org.uk/ethics
Permaculture principles:
https://knowledgebase.permaculture.org.uk/principles
SIGCHI HCI and Sustainability:
http://www.sigchi.org/communities/hci-sustainability

Key texts:
DiSalvo, C., Sengers, P., Brynjarsdóttir, H. (2010). Mapping the Landscape of Sustainable HCI. Proc. of CHI, ACM 978-1-60558-929-9/10/04.
Dourish, P. (2010). HCI and Environmental Sustainability: The Politics of Design and the Design of Politics. Proc. of DIS, ACM ISBN 978-1-4503-0103-9, 2010/08.
Knowles, B., Blair, L., Hazas, M., Walker, S. (2013). Exploring Sustainability Research in Computing: Where we are and where we go next? Proc. of UBICOMP, ACM 978-1-4503-1770-2/13/09.
Mollison, B.
(1988). Permaculture – A Designer's Manual ISBN 978-0-908228-01-0

Date and Time

Location

Edinburgh Napier University

Merchiston Campus

10 Colinton Road, Room B32

Edinburgh

EH10 5DT

United Kingdom

View Map

Refund Policy

Contact the organiser to request a refund.

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