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Sports Nutrition Seminar - From paper to podium: fuelling a Grand Tour - Pr...

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University of Bath

Claverton Down

BA2 7AY

United Kingdom

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Sports Nutrition Seminar

Supported by the Department for Health (University of Bath), and The Physiological Society


Schedule - 28th February 2018

18:00 - Jamie Pugh - Gastrointestinal microbiota and probiotics: No guts, no glory?

18:20 - Prof James Morton - From paper to podium: fuelling a Grand Tour


Location: Chancellor's Building, Room 2.6


Biography

Professor James Morton, Liverpool John Moores University and Team Sky

James is a Professor of Exercise Metabolism at Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU). James' specific research interests focus on the molecular and cellular responses of human skeletal muscle to acute and chronic exercise and the impact of diet and nutrition on modulating these responses. To date, he has authored over 120 research publications in the fields of sports nutrition, physiology and metabolism as well as numerous books / book chapters on these topics. In addition to research, James also works in elite professional sport in both sports physiology and nutrition support roles. From 2010-2015, he was the performance nutritionist to Liverpool FC and also specializes in providing nutritional and conditioning support to a range of professional boxers, MMA athletes and jockeys. Since December 2014, James has also acted as Head of Nutrition for Team Sky leading the nutrition strategy for the 2015 , 2016, 2017 and 2018 Tour de France victories. He also directs nutrition related research projects for the English Institute of Sport (EIS) and is Director of World Class Knowledge for Science in Sport (SiS).


Abstract

From paper to podium: fuelling a Grand Tour

The cycling grand tours (the Giro d’Italia, Tour de France, Vuelta Espana) represent the pinnacle of the cycling road season where riders compete over 21 consecutive days. Each grand tour represents a total distance of approximately 3500 km with climbing distance ranging from 40-50,000 metres. The race is competed over different types of stages usually comprising flat stages, mountain stages and time-trials. Each stage usually commences between 12 noon and 1 pm and finishes between 5 and 6 pm, thus leaving 18 to 20 hours to recover for the next day. From a nutritional perspective, the priority goals are therefore to promote optimal fuelling and recovery though it is noteworthy that weight management throughout the 3 weeks is also a cause for concern. Additionally, riders will compete in extreme environmental conditions comprising changing ambient temperatures and altitudes. In this presentation, I will discuss the transition from paper to podium by outlining the translation of science to practice to achieve the nutritional objectives outlined above. Whilst the pursuit of performance is usually achieved through the combinations of innovations in research and improvements in practical execution, it is also suggested that it is the final step of delivery that makes the biggest difference in sport.

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University of Bath

Claverton Down

BA2 7AY

United Kingdom

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