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Sports Volunteering Research Network - Seminar, March 2020

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Sport England

21 Bloomsbury Street

London

WC1B 3HF

United Kingdom

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10.00 - 10.30 Registration and Welcome

10.30 – 11.10 The lifecycle of sport volunteering - who volunteers when and why

Will Watt, Product Director, Jump Projects

The first review of Active Lives in 2017/18 showed a ‘significant decrease of over 400,000 people’ in the rates of sport volunteering on the previous year. To try to understand more about why this might be, Sport England briefed Jump to build on the work in sport volunteering, and to: • design a survey with a more robust sample size of current and ex-sport volunteers in England • ensure the survey is consistent and complementary to other national datasets (e.g. Community Life) to enable direct comparison between sport and general volunteering, and provide a clearer view of the similarities and differences between them • evidence the links in the existing and new data sets between sport participation and volunteering • explore the ‘lifecycle’ of sport volunteering and identify key life stages for the recruitment and retention of volunteers in sport • build on Sport England and Jump’s work in 2018 (Cancer Research UK, the National Trust and BT) on diversity in volunteering (ethnicity and socio economic status).

11.10 – 11.50 Family and volunteering: findings so far and implications for volunteering in sport

Kristen Natale, Head of Volunteering, Sport England and Véronique Jochum, Head of Research, NCVO

An update on the findings so far from new research led by NCVO which is seeking to explore and understand better the links between family and volunteering. Existing research suggests that household structure and whether parents volunteer or have volunteered in the past can influence the likelihood of individuals volunteering, but our knowledge about the relationship between family dynamics and volunteering is still relatively limited. This research, in partnership with the University of Birmingham and the University of Salford, aims to improve understanding of how families engage with volunteering and how organisations engage with families through volunteering. The ultimate aim is to support volunteer-involving organisations that want to develop or enhance volunteering opportunities for family members. This presentation will share an update on the findings to date and provide an opportunity to discuss what this might mean for sport volunteering. The discussion will help inform the development of practical guidance for volunteer-involving organisations.

11.50 – 12.40 Discussion

12.40 – 13.25 Lunch (provided) and Networking

13.25 – 14.05 Organizational socialization and the decision to volunteer: a study of volunteers in English golf clubs

Chris Mills, Manchester Metropolitan University, PhD Student

This presentation will report on findings from a PhD study researching golf club volunteers in England. It problematizes the use of psychological factors (e.g. personality types and motivations) to understand the decision to volunteer, arguing instead for a deeper appreciation of the social interactions that take place within sports clubs. Using constructivist grounded theory method, the study collected qualitative data from documents, observations in 4 golf clubs and in-depth semi-structured interviews with 29 golf club volunteers. The findings show how the socialization of golf club members strongly influences whether they volunteer and gives rise to a meaningful decision to volunteer. The implications for social reproduction or change within golf clubs are discussed.

14.05 – 14.15 England Golf's experience of funding a PhD studentship

Matt Bloor, England Golf

This short presentation will explore England Golf's experience of funding a PhD studentship and discuss what has been achieved through the relationship with Manchester Metropolitan University.

14.15 – 14.55 Sharing the lessons of youth volunteering in Doorstep Sport

John Downes, Head of Youth and Sport and Street Games North East Area Director

StreetGames have created a second ‘Lessons of’ document following the creating of the ‘Lessons of Doorstep Sport’. The lessons of youth volunteering collates a number of academic research pieces from the last 10 years. It outlines the key learnings from StreetGames work in developing young volunteers through sport and physical activity in areas of poverty across the UK. This presentation will share these lessons, models of delivery, the impact of youth volunteering on the lives of young people and what needs to happen next to continue this impact.

14.55 – 15.35 The paradoxes of governing and the role of temporality

Richard Tacon, Birkbeck, University of London

Those with experience of 'doing governance' in sport and other sectors have identified its paradoxical aspects. Boards must control the executive staff, while also collaborating with them. Boards must represent particular constituencies, while also acting independently in the best interests of the organisation. This raises the question: How do board members manage these paradoxes? Furthermore, how do they manage them over time? What role does temporality - 'The temporal experience of actors that forces them to reconstruct past and future on an ongoing basis' (Hernes et al., 2013: 2) - play in how board members manage these tensions? This presentation explores these questions, drawing on a longitudinal case study of one UK-based national governing body of sport.

15.35 – 16.15 Discussion

16.15 – 16.30 Concluding remarks


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Location

Sport England

21 Bloomsbury Street

London

WC1B 3HF

United Kingdom

View Map

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