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Sticky blood and heart attacks: trying to find better drugs to reduce plate...

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Wills Memorial Building

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Bristol

BS8

United Kingdom

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Heart attacks occur when a blockage called a thrombosis develops in the blood vessels of the heart. Platelets, the major blood cell involved in thrombosis development, can be switched on to become sticky by a wide variety of mediators. These tiny blood cells normally help your body form clots to stop bleeding. If one of your blood vessels gets damaged, it sends out signals that are picked up by platelets. The platelets then rush to the site of damage and form a plug, or clot, to repair the damage. However, when platelets activate too much or at the wrong time and place the result is thrombosis, leading to heart attacks and stroke.

Research from the Bristol Platelet Group continues to develop our understanding of the complex nature of platelet function. In this public lecture Professor Stuart Mundell from the Bristol Platelet Group will outline how their translational research ranging from patients who suffer with mild bleeding to those on current antiplatelet therapies continues to help in the development of new, safer and more effective drugs for the treatment and prevention of cardiac disease.

This event will be followed by a drinks reception.

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Date and Time

Location

Wills Memorial Building

Reception Room

Bristol

BS8

United Kingdom

View Map

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