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Stronger Towns: What can the census tell us? - Friday 19 July 2019

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Room G01, Institute of Health Informatics (UCL)

222 Euston Road

London

NW1 2DA

United Kingdom

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Stronger Towns: What can the census tell us? - Friday 19 July 2019

Hosted by CeLSIUS, UCL in partnership with UCL Innovation & Enterprise. The event is kindly sponsored by the ESRC.


Overview

This event aims to start a conversation about how census data – particularly from the ONS Longitudinal Study, might help to inform policy decisions on creating stronger and more prosperous towns.

Policymakers, practitioners, businesses and academics are invited to contribute their thoughts on how census data might help support the ongoing debate about neighbourhoods, housing and work.

The event is hosted by CeLSIUS, UCL which supports use of the ONS Longitudinal Study. The study is based on a one per cent sample of census returns since 1971, linked to other life events such as births, emigrations and cancer registrations. It now includes records for more than 1.1 million individuals and provides the basis for a rich and detailed analysis of our social geography in recent decades.


There will be opportunities both for discussion within the group and also over a working lunch.


Contributions will include:


Keynote Speaker: Rachel Laurence, Director of Programmes and Practice - New Economics Foundation.

Professor Tony Champion on left-behind places. Where are they, who stays and who leaves? What is the role of socio-economic status in determining this? Are those who have higher levels of education, for example, more likely to leave and not return? And what might make them more likely to come back once they have left?

Dr Rory Coulter on housing: Are issues of access and affordability in the housing market increasing intergenerational inequalities? Focusing particularly on young people, this presentation will examine what the ONS Longitudinal Study can tell us about housing inequalities and about changing patterns of social mobility in the housing system across England and Wales. Dr Coulter will highlight new ways in which the ONS Longitudinal Study can be harnessed for housing research.

Dr Emily Murray on worklessness at older ages. This presentation will look at early exit from the labour market in areas of high unemployment. Dr Murray will also reflect on what census data can tell us more broadly about later life worklessness, as well as touching on other recent research which shows links between young adult unemployment and later health issues which can affect people’s ability to work at older ages.


Chair: Fran Abrams


Who is the event for?

This event is open to policymakers, practitioners, businesses and academics from across UCL.

Any questions?

If you have any queries in the meantime, please contact Jo Tomlinson.


Speaker biographies:

Tony Champion is Emeritus Professor of Population Geography at Newcastle University. His research interests include changes in population distribution and composition, with particular reference to counterurbanisation and population deconcentration in developed countries, and the policy implications of changes in local population profiles. He has used the ONS Longitudinal Study in several studies, most recently for monitoring career progression for England’s 10 largest city regions and for measuring rates of 10-year address changing, both comparing the decades 1971-2001. His other work includes contributions to ‘The State of the English Cities’ for CLG and ‘Uneven Growth: Tackling City Decline’ for JRF.


Rory Coulter is Lecturer in Quantitative Human Geography at UCL. His research focuses on housing, neighbourhoods and residential mobility. More broadly, Rory is interested in longitudinal research and the contribution that longitudinal datasets can make to our understanding of the life course. Rory recently completed an ESRC funded research project that used the ONS Longitudinal Study to examine social and spatial inequalities in young adults’ housing careers.


Emily Murray is Senior Research Associate at the UCL Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health. She is a social epidemiologist whose work focuses on how where people live throughout their lives can affect both health and well-being. She is currently working on a project to determine whether living in a disadvantaged neighbourhood in early life matters more than at other stages of the life course and whether accumulated neighbourhood disadvantage impacts on later life health and well-being. She is also researching extended working lives in order to understand how to encourage older people’s work participation in jobs that will be satisfying and promote healthy ageing.


Fran Abrams is a journalist and Chief Executive of the Education Media Centre, a charity devoted to promoting good evidence about education. Previously she was education correspondent of The Independent, Sunday Times and Sunday Telegraph and also spent 15 years as a reporter on BBC Radio Four’s investigative File on 4 programme, during which time she made many documentaries focusing on housing and on issues relating to social exclusion. Her five published books include work on young people ‘Not in Education, Employment or Training’, on low-paid work and on teenagers. She is currently co-authoring a book on refugee education.


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Room G01, Institute of Health Informatics (UCL)

222 Euston Road

London

NW1 2DA

United Kingdom

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