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'Subjectivity, Self-Narratives and the History of Emotions' International S...

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Terrace Room

Bramber House, Refectory Road

Falmer

Brighton

BN1 9QU

United Kingdom

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Where many History of Emotions studies have focused on norms and discourses, this one-day international symposium asks how we can explore how thoughts and feelings could be articulated, expressed and repressed through what is understood as individual subjectivities. This approach is crucial if we are to understand why people act in certain ways and thus how historical change occurs. This event thus seeks to engage with discussions from leading historians who work with emotions and subjectivities on how we can explore subjective experience and emotional practices - the way in which emotions are performed and produced by a historically-situated body - while simultaneously thinking about broader cultural histories of emotions.

The aim of the international symposium is to facilitate discussion of creative methodologies, as well as a development of cross-period perspectives on emotions and subjectivities. It will be held on Friday 18 January 2019 and will take place in the Terrace Room, Bramber House at the University of Sussex, and will include keynotes by Thomas Dixon, Ute Frevert, Rhodri Hayward, Tim Hitchcock, Claire Langhamer, William Reddy, Lyndal Roper, and Penny Summerfield.

***UPDATE- unfortunately due to illness Sasha Handley will not longer be able to deliver her keynote.

From 5.15pm there will be a wine reception to celebrate the recent publication of Dr Laura Kounine's book Imagining the Witch: Emotions, Gender, and Selfhood in Early Modern German (Oxford University Press):

Imagining the Witch explores emotions, gender, and selfhood through the lens of witch-trials in early modern Germany. Witch-trials were clearly a gendered phenomenon, but witchcraft was not a uniquely female crime. Witchcraft was also a crime of unbridled passion: it centred on the notion that one person's emotions could have tangible and deadly physical consequences. Yet it is also true that not all suspicions of witchcraft led to a formal accusation, and not all witch-trials led to the stake. Through an examination of case studies of witch-trials that took place in the early modern Lutheran duchy of Württemberg in southwestern Germany, Laura Kounine examines how the community, church, and the agents of the law sought to identify the witch, and how ordinary men and women fought for their lives in an attempt to avoid the stake. The study further explores the visual and intellectual imagination of witchcraft in this period in order to piece together why witchcraft could be aligned with such strong female stereotypes, but also be imagined as a crime that could be committed by any human, whether young or old, male or female. By moving beyond stereotypes of the witch, Imagining the Witch argues that understandings of what constituted witchcraft and the 'witch' appear far more contested and unstable than has previously been suggested. It also suggests new ways of thinking about early modern selfhood which moves beyond teleological arguments about the development of the 'modern' self. Indeed, the trial process itself created the conditions for a diverse range of people to give meaning to emotions, gender, and the self in early modern Lutheran Germany.


Symposium schedule:

9.00-9.15 Registration

9.15-9.30 Welcome and Introduction – Laura Kounine

9.30-10.30 Session 1 – Chair: Laura Kounine (Sussex)

9.30-10.00 Lyndal Roper “Writing Biography: Theology and Subjectivity”

10.00-10.30 Thomas DixonWhat is the History of Anger a History of?”

10.30-11.00 Coffee Break and Pastries

11.00-12.15 Session 2 – Chair: Eva Johanna Holmberg (Helsinki/QMUL)

11.00-11.30 Tim HitchcockHistorical Simulacra: Breathing Life into the Digital Dead”

11.30-12.00 Rhodri Hayward R. G. Collingwood, Magic Shoes and Plasticine: Thinking about a Material History of the Inner Life”

12.00-12.15 Discussion of morning sessions

12.15-1.30 Lunch

13.30-14.30 Session 3 – Chair: Lucy Noakes (Essex)

13.30-14.00 Bill Reddy "Crises of Subjectivity: Early Modern Turning Points in the History of the Self."

14.00-14.30 Ute FrevertEmotions as Individual and Social”

14.30-15.00 Coffee Break and Biscuits

15.00-16.00 Session 4 – Chair: Hester Barron (Sussex)

15.00-15.30 Claire Langhamer “Feelings, Work and Selfhood”

15.30- 16.00 Penny Summerfield Seeking the Subjective in the Past: Historians, Evidence and Personal Narratives”

16.00-16.15 Break

16.15-17.00 Roundtable, chaired by Laura Kounine, with comments from Ute Frevert, Claire Langhamer and Bill Reddy

17.00-18.00 Book launch for Laura Kounine’s ‘Imagining the Witch: Emotions, Gender and Selfhood in Early Modern Germany' and wine reception


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Date and Time

Location

Terrace Room

Bramber House, Refectory Road

Falmer

Brighton

BN1 9QU

United Kingdom

View Map

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