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Dalhousie Building

Lecture Theatre 4

Dundee

DD1 5EN

United Kingdom

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Speakers:

Professor Nihal Perera,Ball State University, USA

Professor Divya Jindal-Snape, University of Dundee

Professor, Jailson de Souza e Silva, UNIPeriferias, Brazil

Dr. Favita Dias, Goa University, India

Dr. Fiona Kumari Campbell, University of Dundee

CHAIR: Dr Fernando, Ferndandes, Univeristy of Dundee/UNIPerifarias


There is a burgeoning literature around decolonising university research and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) to challenge the dominance of Eurocentric norms in the legitimisation of knowledges, research methods and pedagogies (Ahmed, 2012; Applebaun, 2010; Bhambra et al, 2018; Campbell, 2014; Ferguson et al, 2019; Iveković; Manathunga, 2018; Santos, 2014). Although decolonisation, itself has been identified as an elusive and slippery category – meaning different things to different scholars and initiatives – from a metaphorical approach to one grounded in the lived experiences of students and academics shaped by legacies of the colonised global south; we are in agreement with Santos’(2014) litmus test that social justice must be connected with epistemic justice.

We take decolonisation to encompass not only formalised transfers of power, but also larger and sometimes coverts processes by which individuals and groups confront the legacy and violence of empire in memory, interactions, thought and public recognition. Decolonisation does not just grapple with the implication of imperialist encounters with colonised countries/spaces; there is the matter of intracolonisation – those knowledge-power relations among colonised peoples based on stratifications of class, caste, location, colourist, tribalist, sexist, ableist and sexuality divisions, including indigenised adaptive space (see Perera, 1998). Iveković (2000) points to existing asymmetries between ‘east’ and ‘west’ when there is dialogue, arguing that the Global South has never been able and will never be able to respond to any of euro-metropole questions because for the global south, they are poor questions and false problems. This conundrum is a challenge to any decolonisation project. The aim of this event is to re-tell stories where white heterosexual upper-class men are no longer the protagonists, and to think critically about ways to re-shape our present reality in efforts towards decolonisation. We have five internationally recognised speakers who will ponder some of the following questions:

  • Where is decolonising working today in SCOTL and research; why is it so popular, and is this popularity a strategy of co-optation that undermines its very purpose?

  • How does the shape of the decolonisation project change depending upon the space-of-its emergence, for instance in postcolonialised spaces in the global South, contrasting with Europeanised spaces where there are low numbers of peoples from colonised nations (e.g. Scotland)?

  • In what ways can Europeanised universities collaborate with universities located in the global south so as enhance the circulation of knowledges from the peripheries without unwittingly fostering co-dependencies?

  • In what way can the fight against ethics dumping in poor Global South countries as exemplified in the 2018 Global Code of Conduct for Research in Resource-Poor Settings be engaged as an instrument for decolonising research initiatives?

  • What current and future transnational efforts can be deployed to challenge the global ‘colour line’ as well as engage in broader matters of intersectionality?

  • In the focus on outwith colonialities, it is possible to lose sight of intra-colonial realities of research spaces which exclude researchers based for example on casteism, non-metropole-rurality, ethnicity, patronage and other types of exclusion. What are the challenges and strategies that have been used to engage with these realities?

  • What current pedagogical strategies already support a decolonial orientation or problematise ‘white expansiveness’, and what new strategies might need to be developed?

  • What administrative choices at universities (admissions policies, monetary support, prerequisite training, flexible mitigation policies) might need to be reconsidered in light of decolonisation?



We invite registrants to send in a question for speakers in advance, email f.k.campbell@dundee.ac.uk, with the subject heading: 'Questions'.

This event will be live streamed and photographs will be taken during the symposium which may be used post event

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Date and Time

Location

Dalhousie Building

Lecture Theatre 4

Dundee

DD1 5EN

United Kingdom

View Map

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