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Synthetic Biology for Bioprocessing of Next Generation Biologics

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Manchester Institute of Biotechnology

Princess Street

Manchester

M1 7DN

United Kingdom

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**REGISTRATION IS NOW CLOSED, please contact joanne.flannelly@manchester.ac.uk if you wish to enquire about a late registration.

Addressing the challenges for Bioprocessing 2025 by application of synthetic biology approaches

Working in partnership, the KTN and COEBP are pleased to be hosting this event on April 26th at the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology. This meeting will bring together the industrial and academic bioprocessing sector with practitioners of synthetic biology to address the challenges of, and opportunities for enhancement of, the manufacture of tomorrow’s biologics.

Focusing on the future needs in the production of protein- and non-protein-based biopharmaceutical products, it is intended that the meeting will build collaborative understanding across the parallel bioprocessing and synthetic biology communities to facilitate productive interactions for future research and innovation in this sector in the UK.

The outline agenda will cover the following three general themes:

(1) Needs and challenges in the design of next generation biologics

(2) Future expression factories for the production of biologics

(3) Underpinning technologies driving innovative changes

We encourage attendees to consider submitting a poster – this should be highlighted when registering - and we offer the opportunity to have the poster selected for a short oral presentation.

Please note this meeting is intended for technical practitioners in the fields of synthetic biology and biologics bioprocessing. Places are limited, and in the event that we are oversubscribed, the organisers reserve the right to review and assign spaces.

The full agenda can be seen below, but session info is below:

(1) Needs and challenges in the design of next generation biologics

Novel format products are being generated that are more effective, lead to easier synthesis, present easier purification, exhibit greater stability as therapeutics and offer the potential for production in simple expression systems. The design of non-protein-based biologics is dependent on rationalized design for effective manufacture and functionality. Coupling design needs and challenges to integrated synthetic biology approaches/technologies opens new potential for the pipeline of future biologics.

(2) Future expression factories for the production of biologics

New products are challenging the capabilities of existing expression systems to provide effective platforms for manufacture. Re-engineering existing platforms to match the needs of new format products will open future possibilities for innovative therapeutic approaches. Cellular (bacterial, yeasts, plants, mammalian) systems each have advantages and disadvantages towards the generation of specific biologics. Increasing the design profile of such systems by knowledge-led engineering opens the potential for an increased range, and effectiveness of biologics. Engineering towards cell-free platforms will require optimization of synthetic pathways and effectiveness in vitro.

(3) Underpinning technologies driving innovative changes

Knowledge of cellular systems and the manner in which the bioprocess components (system, product and environment) interact is key towards optimization of biologics manufacture. Fundamental knowledge including the ability to generate meaningful and well-controlled datasets of process parameters and the ability to provide unbiased and informative data analysis underpins hypothesis generation to engineer biologic and expression systems for coordinated matching of manufacture design and selection.

Agenda

10:00 Arrival & Refreshments

10:30 Session 1: Needs and challenges in the design of next generation biologics

10:30 Alan Dickson, CoEBP, University of Manchester

Technical overview and future opportunities for biologics

10:55 Paul Barker, Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge

Functional Protein Materials - What to design that biology doesn’t already make?

11:20 Peter Rugbjrg, Technical University of Denmark

Poster flash: Evolution Constrains Large-scale Bio-production

11:25 Group discussion

12:00 Lunch, Posters & Networking

13:00 Session 2: Future expression factories for the production of biologics

13:00 Sam Heywood, UCB Celltech

The Challenge of Difficult Therapeutic Protein Production

13:25 Susan Rosser, UK Centre for Mammalian Synthetic Biology Research, Edinburgh

Synthetic Biology tools for mammalian cell engineering

13:50 Jags Pandhal, University of Sheffield,

Poster flash: E. coli as a cell platform for producing bespoke protein glycoforms

13:55 Group discussion

14:20 Refreshments, Posters & Networking

14:50 Session 3: Underpinning technologies driving innovative changes

14:50 Ryan Cawood, Oxford Genetics

Optimising Genetic Constructs for Virus and Protein Expression

15:10 Tom Henley, Horizon Discovery

Genome editing: new advances in the generation & applications of engineered cells

15:30 Anthony Green, University of Manchester

Next Generation Protein Engineering: Beyond the Genetic Code

15:50 Group discussion

16:15 Lessons learned

16:30 Close for Drinks Reception & Networking





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Manchester Institute of Biotechnology

Princess Street

Manchester

M1 7DN

United Kingdom

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