£140 – £175

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The role of the Public Sector Equality Duty in Education

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Communities Empowerment Network

245a Coldharbour Lane

London SW9 8RR

SW9 8RR

United Kingdom

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The role of the Public Sector Equality Duty in Education

The Public Sector Equality Duty (PSED) was introduced with the passing of the Equality Act 2010 (the Act). It has a long evolutionary history, with the race equality duty being introduced under the Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000, following the MacPherson Inquiry into the murder of Stephen Lawrence. Its overall aim was to eliminate institutional racism. The race equality duty was later followed by disability and gender equality duties under previous sex and disability discrimination legislation. The PSED then replaced these duties encompassing a broader range of protected characteristics when the Equality Act 2010 was introduced.

The key principle underlying the PSED is that it is a proactive duty designed to prevent discrimination as well as eliminate any existing discrimination. It also plays a role in advancing equality of opportunity and fostering good relations between different groups. Together these principles take the form of a “general duty” under the Act. There are also certain specific duties placed on most public authorities through secondary legislation to set objectives as well as publish information on how the duty is being met. The aim of the specific duties is to assist the public authority in meeting its general duty.

The PSED must be taken into account by public authorities when making individual decisions as well as when generally formulating and implementing policies.

The EHRC has powers to enforce both the general and specific duties. Furthermore individuals can take a judicial review case if they think that there has been a breach of the general duty.

The principles behind the PSED are highly relevant to education, particularly regarding areas where there is disproportionality such as in exclusions and attainment levels. Where inequalities exist certain actions should be taken by public authorities including both local authorities and schools.

About this training

This training is aimed primarily at teachers and school governors as well as local authority personnel and SEN experts including those who sit on appeal and review panels. It is designed to outline the legal obligations placed on public authorities under the PSED when carrying out their functions and policies, and how these apply in an educational context. It is also designed for parents to attend so that they can be clear about what schools and local authorities are required to do under the law as well as how any breaches or apparent breaches of the PSED can be challenged.

What you will get out of the training

You should be clear about:

  • Legal requirements of the PSED
  • Meeting the PSED in policy and decision-making
  • Particular relevance of the PSED in an educational context
  • What good and bad practice may look like in the context of exclusions
  • How breaches of the PSED can be challenged

Who should attend

Head teachers/principals, governors, education officials, SEN experts, parents, community groups involved in tackling inequality in an education context

Dates

Thursday 18 May 2017
Friday 18 August 2017
Thursday 16 November 2017

Time
10.30am-4pm

Venue
Communities Empowerment Network, Unit 101, 245a Coldharbour Lane, London SW9 8RR

Cost
£175 (Early bird booking £140).

Enquiries
Please contact Esther Maynard on 020 7733 0297 or email: esther (@) cenlive (.) org

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Location

Communities Empowerment Network

245a Coldharbour Lane

London SW9 8RR

SW9 8RR

United Kingdom

View Map

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